Below is a timeline of Theodore Turley’s life according to the latest research by family members and others.1 This timeline is still under construction and will continue to be updated as new data becomes available. Please contact us with any questions, corrections, or additions. (Last updated: 20 July 2021)

Timeline Sections
  1. Early Life in England (1801-1826)
  2. Life in Canada (1827-1838)
  3. Far West, Evacuation of Saints, and Settling Nauvoo (1838-1839)
  4. Mission to England (1839-1840)
  5. Life in Nauvoo, Illinois (1840-1846)
  6. Exodus from Nauvoo and Life in Winter Quarters (1846-1849)
  7. Crossing the Plains and Life in the Salt Lake Valley (1849-1851)
  8. Settling San Bernardino, California (1851-1857)
  9. Life in Southern Utah (1858-1871)
1. Early Life in England

1801
April 10: Theodore was born in Birmingham, England, to William Turley and Elizabeth Yates. He was their fourth child and first son.2
May 29: Theodore was christened at the church of St. Martin in the Bull Ring in Birmingham, England.3

1814
Theodore was apprenticed to Master James Parkes, a “Stamper, Piercer, and Toolmaker,” for seven years.4

1818
Theodore began preaching Methodism as a lay minister.5

1821
November 26: Theodore Turley married Frances Kimberley at St. Peter’s Church in Harborne (southwest Birmingham).6

1822
September 4: A son was born to Theodore and Frances in Birmingham. They named him Theodore Turley, Jr.7
November 26: Theodore Turley, Jr., was christened at St. Philip’s Cathedral in Birmingham. Theodore, Sr., was noted as a “Stamper and Piercer” living on Lench Street.8

1823
Theodore Turley was listed with partner William Lindon in 1823 Wrightson’s Triennial Directory of Birmingham. “Turley and Lyndon, piercers and stampers, 24, Lench-street”9

1824
March 25: Theodore Turley and William Lindon dissolved their business partnership as “Stampers, Piercers, and Tool-makers.”10

1825
January 1: A daughter, Frances Amelia Turley, was born to Theodore and Frances in Birmingham.11
November 21: Theodore Turley and William Lindon gave notice of their dissolved partnership.12

Theodore and his family moved from Birmingham to London.

1826
August 24: Frances Amelia Turley was christened at St. George the Martyr church in south London. Theodore was noted as a “Toole Maker” living at nearby “Snowsfields.”13

Theodore and his family left London and immigrated to York (now Toronto), Canada.14

2. Life in Canada

1827
April 19: Theodore Turley submitted an advertisement to The Colonial Advocate, a newspaper based in York, Ontario, and the ad began to run on April 26th. Theodore announced himself “Gunsmith, Bell-hanger, &c”and gave his address as “Kingstreet near Yonge-street, York.” He stated that he was from London and announced that he was ready to receive orders. Services advertised were guns and pistols repaired; gun worms of all sorts; gun cleaning and other rods; swords made and repaired; screw drivers; letter and figure punches; bag, burn, and sheep marks; letters cut of all descriptions; fishing spears and rods; saws sharpened and repaired; saddlers punches & “creesers” of all descriptions; tinmen and braziers tools; boot and shoe makers tools; joiners and chair-makers “bitts”; locks made and repaired; all kinds of machinery made and repaired; all kinds of metal goods repaired on the shortest notice; smith work of every description made and repaired; old locks, keys, and metal bought.15
July 13: A daughter was born to Theodore and Frances in York. They named her Mary Ann Turley.16

1829
January 1: The Colonial Advocate began to run a different advertisement for Theodore Turley. Theodore was listed as a patent beer and cider pump maker. He informed “the Tavern and Grocery keepers that he Manufactures all kinds of hand lifting or other pumps, at the N. York prices. N. B. All kinds of lamps and lanterns made to order. Tinmen’s patent tools, all kinds of White and Blacksmith work done on the shortest notice.”17
June 1: Another daughter, Priscilla Rebecca Turley, was born in York.18
September 24: Theodore submitted a different type of advertisement to The Colonial Advocate, which began to run in the October 8th edition. Theodore was identified as a smith and brass founder. It stated, “BRASS CASTINGS for Mill work, &c. &c. done on the shortest notice. All kinds of White and Blacksmith’s work done to order. The highest prices, in CASH, will be paid for old brass, copper and tin.”19

Theodore and his family left York and moved to Churchville, Ontario.

1832
May 23: A son, Frederick Turley, was born in Churchville, Ontario.20

1834
June 20: Theodore and Frances purchased a seventy-five acre tract of land in Churchville from Erastus Wiman.21
July 5: A child, Obia Turley, was born to Theodore and Frances. The baby only lived a few weeks.22
July 29: Obia Turley was buried in Churchville, Ontario.23

1835
May 15: Theodore and Frances mortgaged their seventy acres for fifty pounds to a local shopkeeper.24
September 24: A daughter was born to Theodore and Frances in Churchville. They named her Sarah Elizabeth Turley.25

1837
March 1: Theodore Turley and his wife, Frances, were baptized members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Missionary Isaac Russell most likely performed the baptisms.26
April 24: Parley P. Pratt ordained Theodore to the office of a priest at a church conference in Churchville.27
August 3: Theodore and Frances sold their seventy-five acre tract of land in Churchville for three-hundred-twenty-five pounds. Fellow Latter-day Saint William Law was one of the two witnesses to the property transfer.28
September: Theodore was called on a mission to Canada. He later reported he “Built up a Church . . . of 17 members in 3 wekes[;] among the Number was Elder Mulholand[,] Standing & Mulliner.”29
November 9: Theodore wrote a letter to his friend, Isaac Russell, who was on a mission in England. Theodore reported on a recent trip to Kirtland, Ohio, where he had the opportunity to visit with Russell’s family. Theodore also mentioned missionary efforts and the death of his son, Theodore Turley, Jr.30
November 10: William Law wrote a letter to Isaac Russell. He mentioned that Theodore Turley and Robert B. Thompson “built up a little branch in the upper part of Chyngacousy [Chinguacousy] of 12 members.” William Law also wrote, “I suppose Bro. Turly told you that he sold and will move off next Spring &c.”31
November 12: A son was born to Theodore and Frances in Churchville. They named him Isaac after their friend Isaac Russell who introduced them to The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.32

1838
Theodore and Frances traveled with a group of fellow Latter-day Saints to settle in Far West, Missouri, led by Elder Almon W. Babbitt. Theodore later recalled that he, Frances, and their six children (Frances A., Mary Ann, Priscilla, Frederick, Sarah, and Isaac) made the journey with two wagons and four horses.33

3. Far West, Evacuation of Saints, and Settling Nauvoo

1838
July: Theodore and his family arrived in Far West, Missouri.34
October 27: Missouri Governor Lilburn Boggs issued an executive order for Mormons to be “exterminated or driven from the State if necessary.”35
December 19: Theodore Turley was noted as a member of the Far West High Council.36
December 22: Theodore was ordained a seventy by Heber C. Kimball in Far West.37

1839
January 26: At a meeting in Far West, Theodore was appointed to a committee to “ascertain the number of families who are actually destitute of means for their removal.”38
January 29: At the following meeting, Theodore was appointed to the seven-member committee of removal. The purpose of this committee was to “superintend the business of our removal and to provide for those who have not the means of moving till the work shall be completed.”39
April 4: Theodore Turley and Heber C. Kimball visited Joseph Smith and other imprisoned church leaders at Liberty Jail. “[B]rothers Kimball and Turley were not permitted to enter the Prison, and all the communication we had with them, was thro’ the grate of the dungeon.”40
April 7: The committee of removal met at Theodore Turley’s home in Far West.41
April 24: Theodore encountered Brigham Young and several other members of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles near Tenney’s Grove, en route to Far West.42
April 26: Theodore Turley spoke with Isaac Russell in Far West, Missouri. Theodore told him that he’d just witnessed Brigham Young and other Apostles fulfill a prophecy by Joseph Smith by returning to the Far West temple site on 26 April 1839 prior to departing on their missions.43
May 6: At a conference in Quincy, Illinois, church leaders stated that Theodore Turley’s gunsmith tools would “remain for the general use of the Church untill his return from Europe.”44

Settling Commerce (later named Nauvoo), Illinois

1839
May: Theodore began building his home in Commerce, Hancock County, Illinois, out of logs and stone. Because they arrived in Commerce during the spring, he had to wait until after the family had planted their crops of corn and potatoes. It took about two months to complete the home.45
June 16: James Mulholland recorded Theodore Turley presiding with two other men at a Sunday meeting in Commerce.46
July 18: On this date, James Mulholland recorded that he “moved to Brother Turleys.” Theodore’s newly-constructed home was the first built by a Latter-day Saint in what would later become Nauvoo. A history of the Church published in 1854 stated that Theodore Turley’s house “was built of logs about twenty five or thirty rods north north east of [Joseph Smith’s] dwelling, on the north east corner of lot 4 block 147 of the White purchase.”47

4. Mission to England

1839
September 21: Theodore departed for his mission to England.48

1840
March 16: Theodore Turley was imprisoned at the jail in Stafford on charges of unpaid debts.49
April 15: Back home in Nauvoo, a daughter was born to Frances and Theodore. She was named Charlotte Turley.50
May 7: Brigham Young mentioned Theodore Turley in a letter to Joseph Smith. “I suppose that some that came over with us will return Brothers [Hiram] Clark and Hadlock [Reuben Hedlock]— and Brother [Theodore] Turley if he gets at liberty. I suppose you have heard that he is in prison. he has been there ever since my arrival in… England and how long he will remain there the Lord only knows, he was put there through the influence of a priest as nigh as I can learn, for some old pretended claim but no one can find out what that claim is…. I have just received a letter from Bro Turley which stated he expected to leave his place the next day.”51
May 8: Theodore Turley was discharged from Stafford prison.52
July 28: Theodore Turley and Joseph Fielding left Lane End and rode a coach to West Bromwich. In the evening, they met up with Brother John Needham at Greets Green.53
July 29: Theodore continued his journey with Joseph Fielding to Birmingham. Theodore introduced Joseph Fielding to his family and friends there, and they toured the Town Hall. Joseph Fielding spent the night at the Turley home and then left Birmingham the following day.54
July 30: On Thursday evening, Theodore Turley preached at Greets Green near West Bromwich.55
July 31: Theodore and John Needham took breakfast with a local church member, Bro. Mathews, at Greets Green. Theodore then returned to Birmingham.56
August 2: Theodore Turley spent Sunday at Greets Green with church members, and he apparently brought his little sister, Charlotte, with him. John Needham reported, “Bro Turley led the meeting and gave us much instruction concerning the things of the Kingdom.” Later, after another church meeting, Brother Needham met up with Theodore. “[W]e came together to Greets Green and Brot[her] Turleys Sister [Charlotte] gave us her name for Baptism[.] We went that night and Brot[her] Turley baptised her.”57
August 3: Theodore Turley and his sister, Charlotte, returned to their parents’ home in Birmingham, “Brot[her] Turley being unwell.”58
August 5: After spending a few days in Birmingham, Theodore received a letter instructing him to go to Herefordshire.59
August 9: Theodore Turley, George A. Smith, and Wilford Woodruff held a camp meeting in Herefordshire.60
August 10: Theodore Turley preached with Elders George A. Smith and Wilford Woodruff at Stanley Hill in Herefordshire.61
August 11: Wilford Woodruff “took the parting hand with Elder Turley.” Theodore apparently left Herefordshire that day and went back to the West Midlands. This was the last time the two men saw each other in England.62
August 13: Theodore Turley said goodbye to the Saints at Greets Green. Elder John Needham reported, “[W]e came to Greets Green and found Elder Turley rejoicing with the saints, we rejoiced to see one another, that day [he] gave me a blessing that my tongue should be unlosed and should have wisdom & understanding… [H]e also blest Elder Cordon along with other breathern as he was about bidding the breathern farewell to go to America along with a company of saints.” In the afternoon, Theodore left for Wolverhampton.63

We don’t know exactly where Theodore was from August 13 to September 4, but it’s reasonable to assume that he spent much of that time saying goodbye to church members, family, and friends in the West Midlands, Staffordshire, and Lancashire.

September 4: Theodore Turley met with the emigrating Saints in Liverpool.64

5. Life in Nauvoo, Illinois

1840
November 24: Theodore Turley arrived in Nauvoo.65

1841
February 6: Theodore Turley was brought before the Nauvoo High Council and charged with improper conduct while bringing the company of British Saints from England to Nauvoo. Theodore pled not guilty, but the charges were sustained. Theodore retained his fellowship after acknowledging publicly “that he had acted unwisely, unjustly, imprudently, and unbecoming, and that he had set a bad example before his brethren and sisters as he was coming over from Europe.”66
March: Theodore Turley and the members of his household were enumerated in Hancock County, Illinois, for the 1840 United States Federal Census.67
March 8: The Nauvoo City Council appointed Theodore Turley as city “Weigher and Sealer.”68

1842
January: Traditional date of Theodore Turley’s plural marriage with Mary Clift.69
April 8: Theodore Turley was initiated into first degree of Masonry at the Nauvoo Masonic Lodge.70
April 11: Theodore Turley became a second degree Mason (Fellow Craft) at the Nauvoo Masonic Lodge.71
April 19: Theodore Turley was raised to the degree of Master Mason at the Nauvoo Masonic Lodge.72
September 3-4: A case was brought before the Nauvoo High Council against Gustavus Hills, accused of having “illicit intercourse” with “a certain woman by the name of Mary Clift by which she is with child.” Hills was also accused of telling Mary Clift that church leaders did the same and “the time would come when men would have more wives than one &c.” Gustavus Hills was found guilty of the charges and disfellowshipped.73 Robert Clift, Mary’s father, later brings a paternity suit against Hills. Hills signs an agreement on September 15th to financially support Mary Clift and the child.74
September 13: A son was born to Theodore and Frances. They named him Johnathan Turley.75
September 26: The Nauvoo City Council approved a $5.00 claim by Theodore Turley for making the city seal.76
October 20: Mary Clift‘s son, Jason, was born in Nauvoo.77

1843
February 25: Theodore Turley was sworn in as Nauvoo’s Weigher and Sealer.78
March 7: Theodore inquired about the “wisdom concerning a brewery” in Nauvoo. Three days later, Joseph Smith decided he had no objections to a brewery being built.79
September 24: Theodore Turley was ordained a high priest by George Miller in Nauvoo.80
October 26: Mary Clift‘s one-year-old son, Jason L. Clift, died of black canker in Nauvoo.81
October 27: Theodore Turley submitted a $2.50 claim to the Nauvoo City Council for “Making 2 Pair of Shackels for Crimanals.”82
December 27: The Nauvoo Neighbor, a local newspaper, began to run an advertisement for Theodore’s new brewery: “T. TURLEY begs leave to inform the inhabitants of Nauvoo and vicinity, that he has constantly on hand a supply of Ale, Beer, and Yeast of the best quality for sale, both wholesale and retail, at his Brewery, corner of Hyde and Water Streets.”83

1844
January 25: Theodore Turley received a deed from Joseph Smith for his property in Nauvoo. Theodore paid $300 for the east undivided three-quarters of Lot 4 in Block 147.84
March 6: Traditional date of Theodore Turley’s plural marriage to Eliza Clift.85
April 2: Theodore submitted a claim to the Nauvoo City Council for “Making 2 pair of Shackels & puting on Irons on prisoners.”86
April 26: Sarah Ellen Clift was married to Theodore Turley as a plural wife.87
June 8: Theodore Turley testified to the Nauvoo City Council that William Law and Wilson Law brought him “Bogus” dies to fix for counterfeiting money. 88
June 18: Joseph Smith appointed Theodore Turley armorer general of the Nauvoo Legion.89
June 27: Joseph Smith and his brother, Hyrum, were killed at the county jail in Carthage, Hancock County, Illinois.90
October 15: Theodore Turley, chairman of the trade committee on blacksmithing, was unable to attend a trades meeting on this date at the Masonic Hall in Nauvoo on account of being sick.91
October 16: Hosea Stout recorded meeting at Theodore Turley’s home in his journal. “In the morning went to see a lot of 100 muskets, at the request of Gen[era]l Rich, which were at Col[onel] Turley’s, which had just been purchased at New Orleans for the Nauvoo Legion, by Br[other] Turley.”92

1845
February 4: Theodore Turley’s name was among a list of eighteen men recommended to become members of the Council of Fifty.93
February 11: A son, Ephraim Turley, was born to Theodore Turley and Mary Clift.94
March 1: Theodore Turley was admitted as a member of the Council of Fifty.95
March 4: Theodore attended a meeting of the Council of Fifty.96
March 11: Theodore attended a meeting of the Council of Fifty. Theodore’s future son-in-law, Cyrus Daniels, was admitted to the council in this meeting.97
March 18: Theodore attended a meeting of the Council of Fifty. He was assigned at this meeting to “go to work and make fifteen shooters and Bowie Knives.”98
March 22: Theodore attended a meeting of the Council of Fifty. In the afternoon session of this meeting, Theodore was appointed with two other men to form a committee overseeing the writing of the Nauvoo Legion’s history.99
April 30: The Nauvoo Neighbor reported on Theodore Turley’s production of firearms. “Our friend Turley is turning out come of the best fifteen shooters we ever saw. It is to be hoped that he will manufacture enough to satisfy foreign calls, as well as answer home requirements.100
June 4: The Nauvoo Neighbor ran an advertisement from Theodore Turley looking to hire a “first rate gun-smith, to work at stocking and finishing.”101
July 6: Theodore and Mary Clift‘s four-month-old son, Ephraim Turley, died in Nauvoo.102
August 2: A daughter, Princetta Turley, was born to Theodore Turley and Sarah Ellen Clift.103
November 16: Church leaders in Nauvoo learned that Theodore Turley was arrested in Alton, Illinois, on the charge of “bogus making.”104
December 13: Word was received in Nauvoo that “Lucian B. Adams, son of the late Judge Adams has effected a complete revolution in the minds of the inhabitants of Springfield, so much so that Judge Pope is convinced that E[lde]r [Theodore] Turley is imprisoned through persecution and says he shall discharge him the moment he arrives at Springfield.”105
December 17: Theodore Turley was indicted by a grand jury on charges of counterfeiting U.S. and Mexican coins. Eleven other Nauvoo citizens were indicted on the same charges the following day.106
December 18: Theodore Turley was released from custody on $250 bail and returned to Nauvoo. Two Springfield, Illinois, citizens served as bondsmen for him: lawyer Lucian B. Adams and Latter-day Saint Nicholas Groesbeck, who’d previously served as bondsman to Joseph Smith.107
December 20: Theodore Turley and four of his family members (Frances Kimberley, Priscilla Turley, Frances Amelia Turley, and Mary Ann Turley) received their endowments in the Nauvoo Temple.108 Theodore Turley was initiated into the Anointed Quroum.109

1846
January 16: Theodore’s daughter, Priscilla Rebecca Turley, was sealed as a plural wife to Amasa M. Lyman in the Nauvoo Temple.110
January 19: Theodore Turley was sealed to both Frances Kimberley and Sarah Ellen Clift in the Nauvoo Temple.111
January 24: Theodore’s daughter, Frances Amelia Turley, was sealed to Cyrus Daniels in the Nauvoo Temple.112
February 3: Theodore Turley was sealed to both Eliza Clift and Mary Clift in the Nauvoo Temple.113 Theodore’s daughter, Mary Ann Turley, was sealed as a plural wife to Brigham Young on the same day. Theodore Turley served as a witness to that sealing.114

6. Exodus from Nauvoo and Life in Winter Quarters

1846
February 22: Theodore Turley was at Sugar Creek Camp in Lee County, Iowa. Hosea Stout recorded, “In the evening Col. Turley came to my qua[r]ters to assertain the number of Waggon makers and Black Smiths in camp, as it was the intention to set them to work while we lay here.”115
March 5: Sixteen-year-old Priscilla Turley joined Amasa Lyman’s company.116
March 6: Traditional date of death for Henrietta, daughter of Eliza Clift.117
March 10: The Turley family arrived at Richardson’s Point Camp near Keosauqua, Van Buren County, Iowa.118
March 19: The Turley family was still at Richardson’s Point Camp. Hosea Stout recorded, “Today the camp moved again. Amasa Lyman & Theodore Turley staid not being ready for want of teams. & I left Capt. L. H. Calkins and his company to stay with them and come on when they did.”119
April 10: The Turley family was at Locust Creek Camp. Strong winds blew down tents and “turned over Bro. Turle[y]s Buggy.”120
May 12: Three-year-old Johnathan Turley, youngest child of Theodore and Frances, died at Garden Grove Camp in Iowa.121
May 13: Johnathan Turley was buried near Garden Grove. Eliza R. Snow wrote, “I saw the funeral train following to its wilderness grave a little child of Br. Turley. It was a lonely sight—my feelings truly sympathize with those who are call’d to leave their dear relatives by the way.”122
June 4: Back in Springfield, Illinois, the United States Circuit Court considered the counterfeiting indictments against Theodore Turley and other Nauvoo citizens. Because Theodore skipped bail, a writ of scire facias was brought against the two men designated as sureties of Theodore Turley’s $250 bond: Lucian B. Adams and Nicholas Groesbeck.123

Life in Winter Quarters, Nebraska

1846
September 2: Princetta Turley, one-year-old daughter of Theodore Turley and Sarah Ellen Clift, died from a fever in Winter Quarters.124
December 1: Theodore’s twenty-one-year-old daughter, Frances A. Daniels, died after giving birth to a baby girl, Frances [F?] Daniels. The baby also passed away. Both mother and daughter were buried in the same grave at the Winter Quarters cemetery.125
December 5: Twin boys, Joseph Smith Turley and Hyrum Smith Turley, were born to Theodore Turley and Sarah Ellen Clift at Winter Quarters.126

1847
March 5: Joseph Smith Turley, three-month-old twin son of Theodore Turley and Sarah Ellen Clift, died of “water in the brain.”127
April 29: Hyrum Smith Turley, the remaining twin son of Theodore Turley and Sarah Ellen Clift, died of “crupe” at the age of four months.128
May 4: Sarah Ellen Clift, Theodore’s twenty-nine-year-old plural wife, died of scurvy at Winter Quarters.129
August 30: Theodore’s forty-seven-year-old wife, Frances Kimberley, also died of scurvy in Winter Quarters. She was buried in the same grave as her daughter, Frances A. Daniels, and granddaughter, Frances [F?] Daniels.130
November 28: Theodore Turley became a member of the Winter Quarters high council.131

1848
May 28: A son was born to Theodore Turley and Mary Clift. They named him Theodoreus.132
August 27: Theodore wrote a letter to President Brigham Young in Salt Lake City, Utah. He asked for some building materials to be set aside in the Salt Lake Valley for him to build a small house.133
December 31: Theodore and Mary Clift‘s seven-month-old son, Theodoreus Turley, died near Council Bluffs, Iowa.134

1849

7. Crossing the Plains and Life in the Salt Lake Valley

1849

Life in the Salt Lake Valley

1849
Late October: Theodore Turley and his family entered the Salt Lake Valley with the Silas Richards Company.135 He later acquired property on the southwest corner of South Temple and 500 East.136

1850
March 22: A daughter, Frances Kimberley Turley, was born to Theodore Turley and Mary Clift.137
March 30: Theodore’s plural wife, Mary Clift, died from childbirth complications.138
March 31: Mary Clift was buried in the Salt Lake City Cemetery. Hosea Stout recorded in his journal, “[A]ssisted to bury Br T. Turley’s wife.”139
June 18: Theodore married Ruth Jane Giles at the Deseret Mint in Salt Lake City, Utah.140
August 13: Theodore registered his cattle brand, a simple cross on the animal’s left hip.141
December 18: Theodore placed a notice in the Deseret News advertising a lost heifer. The ad appeared in December, January, and February issues of the newspaper.142

1851
January 15: Theodore’s daughter, Mary Ann, obtained an official divorce from Brigham Young. Although Mary Ann was sealed to Brigham Young five years earlier, she apparently never lived in his household.143
February/March: Theodore’s property in Salt Lake City was transferred to Lyman Homiston, who emigrated to Utah in 1850.144
March/April: Theodore and his household members were enumerated in Utah County for the 1850 United States Federal Census.145

8. Settling San Bernardino, California

1851
June 8: While journeying to San Bernardino, the group traveled at night across the hottest portions of the desert. At 9am on June 8th, the group arrived at Bitter Spring. At sundown, most of the group moved on across the Mojave Desert, but Theodore Turley’s wagon and one of Amasa M. Lyman’s wagons remained at Bitter Spring.146
September 8: At Sycamore Grove near San Bernardino, Theodore’s daughter, Mary Ann Turley, married John Cook.147

1852
January 30: A son, Jacob Omner Turley, was born to Theodore Turley and Ruth Jane Giles in San Bernardino.148

1853
Theodore’s daughter, Sarah Elizabeth Turley, married Stephen Franklin in 1853, likely in San Bernardino.149
November 17: Theodore Turley served with James H. Rollins and David Seeley as a school commissioner in San Bernardino.150

1854
March 27: Amasa Lyman recorded that he and Theodore Turley visited the local school to give some advice.151
April 16: Theodore talked with Amasa Lyman about proving what he thought might be “a silver mine in the mountains of Millcreek.”152
June 5: At an election for San Bernardino city officers, Theodore Turley was elected city assessor. His son-in-law, Amasa M. Lyman, was elected mayor.153
October 22: Theodore and David Seeley were appointed supervisors over an expedition “to look for a chance to procure gold by dig[g]ing to enable us to meet our indebtedness on the ranch.”154
November 1: Turley and Seeley’s gold prospecting expedition departed from San Bernardino. Amasa Lyman wrote, “may God spe[e]d and protect them.”155
November 21: The report from Turley and Seeley’s expedition indicated that they did not find very much gold.156
November 22: Amasa Lyman called on Theodore Turley who had been “badly poisoned” by quicksilver (mercury) which had somehow gotten in his bread. “His eye and face were badly swollen.”157
December 25: Amasa Lyman dined with Theodore Turley on Christmas Day in San Bernardino.158

1855
June: Theodore Turley and another Englishman, Orrin Stoddard, were the recipients of the first naturalization papers issued in San Bernardino.159
September 5: Theodore Turley was in San Francisco, California. Caroline Barnes Crosby recorded in her journal that Theodore called at her home in the evening. “We had not seen br Turly since we left Salt lake city. I discovered that he had become quite gray in the cause of truth.”160
September 6: Theodore attended the monthly fast meeting on Thursday evening in San Francisco.161
September 7: Theodore called on the Crosbys in San Francisco.162
September 9: Caroline B. Crosby recorded that Theodore Turley was the “chief speaker” at their morning Sunday meeting and “spoke much to the edification of his audience.” Later in the day Theodore “took tea” with the Crosbys.163
September 13: At a Thursday evening church meeting in San Francisco, Theodore Turley spoke “upon the order and blessings of the priesthood. And showed that it was the only true source through which God conveys intelligence to man, so as to make them wise unto Salvation; and brings them into His celectial kingdom.” Caroline B. Crosby commented, “We were all highly edified with his remarks, and received a testimony, that he spoke by the Holy Spirit.”164
September 17: Theodore took supper with the Crosbys in San Francisco.165
September 18: Theodore took supper with the Crosbys in San Francisco.166
September 20: Theodore took supper with the Crosbys in San Francisco.167
Fall 1855: Jacob Bushman arrived in San Bernardino and worked for a short time with his future father-in-law Theodore Turley and future brother-in-law, John Cook.168
October 28: Theodore wrote a letter to Hosea Stout detailing his experiences with Joseph Smith in the final days before the June 1844 martyrdom. Hosea Stout had requested Theodore’s account as part of a larger effort to compile a history of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.169
November 13: A son, Alvin Hope Turley, was born to Theodore Turley and Ruth Jane Giles in San Bernardino. This was Theodore Turley’s last child.170
December 9: In San Bernardino, Theodore spoke at a Sunday church meeting. He was followed by Elder Charles C. Rich. Caroline B. Crosby recorded, “They both spoke very much to our edification.”171

1856
January 13: Theodore spoke at a Sunday church meeting. He was again followed by Elder Charles C. Rich.172
March 23: Caroline B. Crosby recorded that both Charles C. Rich and Theodore Turley gave “excellent discourses” at the weekly church meeting.173
May 25: Theodore spoke at the Sunday church meeting and was followed by Elder Charles C. Rich. Caroline B. Crosby recorded, “Both their discourses were very interesting.”174
July 4: Theodore Turley spoke at a 4th of July celebration in San Bernardino.175
September 28: Brigham Young, in a speech to Latter-day Saints at the Salt Lake Bowery, argued for the use of handcarts. He used Ruth Jane Giles as an example of a woman who had the endurance to walk many miles in a day. “Our American women think it strange to advance such an idea as women’s walking, but I will refer you to one individual that many of you know, and that is [S]ister Turley who now lives in San Bernardino; after working hard all the week she and her husband frequently used to walk twenty or thirty miles on the Sabbath, and attend three meetings.”176

1857
March 2: Theodore’s daughter, Charlotte Turley, married Jacob Bushman in San Bernardino.177
May 31: Theodore spoke at a Sunday church meeting in San Bernardino. He was followed by Jefferson Hunt.178
December 25: The Turley family, including the families of Frederick & Amelia Turley, Sarah E. & Stephen Franklin and Charlotte & Jacob Bushman, left San Bernardino in company with about twenty other families. They spent Christmas Day in the Cajon Pass on their journey back to Utah.179

1858
January 22: The extended Turley family arrived at the Muddy River, at that point within the borders of Utah Territory. The following day Theodore’s daughter, Charlotte Turley, had her first child. She and Jacob named their daughter Priscilla Elizabeth Bushman.180

9. Life in Southern Utah

Theodore Turley and his family arrived in Utah and initially settled in Cedar City.

1858
February: The extended Turley family reached Cedar City about the first of February. Jacob Bushman and Stephen Franklin then traveled north to Lehi, Utah, leaving their wives and children with Theodore in Cedar City. They returned in March.181
February 14: Theodore was appointed to a committee of five chosen to draft a statement of support on behalf of the residents of Cedar City for Governor Brigham Young “putting the Territory under martial law, and of preventing armed forces under whatever pretence, from entering our Territory.” Theodore also spoke at the meeting, held in the Cedar City Tabernacle, where the “preamble and resolutions were read and unanimously adopted.”182
April: In the first week of April, Charlotte Turley and her husband, Jacob Bushman, left Cedar City and traveled north to settle in Lehi, Utah County, Utah.183
April 8: Theodore’s daughter-in-law, Amelia Louisa Counsell Turley, was one of a number of sisters who bore “testimony and felt to rejoice in the work of the Lord” at the April meeting of the Cedar City Relief Society. “It was moved and seconded that Amelia Turley… become [a member] of this Society, carried Unanimous.”184
May 13: “Sister A. Turley,” Theodore’s daughter-in-law, bore her testimony at the May meeting of the Cedar City Relief Society.185
May 22: Theodore Turley was mentioned in the ledger of the Deseret Iron Company. His account was debited $5.00 for “2000 lbs Coal at Bank.”186
May 29: Theodore Turley was mentioned in the ledger of the Deseret Iron Company. His account was credited $2.00 for “an order by Bosnell.”187
June 10: “A. Turley,” Theodore’s daughter-in-law, bore her testimony at the June meeting of the Cedar City Relief Society.188
June 12: Theodore Turley was mentioned in the ledger of the Deseret Iron Company. His account was credited $2.00 for helping the moulder for one day and exploring for ore.189
June 19: Theodore Turley was mentioned twice in the ledger of the Deseret Iron Company. His account was credited $3.00 for a day of “Fitting Bards[?] on Blast tap &c.” His account was also credited $9.50 for “overseeing brick making &c” for 4.75 days.190
June 26: Theodore Turley was mentioned in the ledger of the Deseret Iron Company. His account was debited $3.20 for use of the punching machine.191
August 6: Erastus Snow and John D. Lee dined at Theodore Turley’s home in Cedar City.192 Erastus Snow was one of the missionaries that had introduced Theodore’s wife, Ruth, and her sister to the gospel in Essex County, Massachusetts, in the early 1840s.193
September 30: Theodore Turley was mentioned in the ledger of the Deseret Iron Company. His account was credited $2.00 for his “boy breaking limestone” for one day.194
October 11: Theodore Turley was mentioned in the ledger of the Deseret Iron Company. His account was credited $2.00 for the work of his son, Isaac, chopping wood for one day.195
October 18: Theodore Turley was mentioned in the ledger of the Deseret Iron Company. He directed his account to be debited $24.05 and the funds sent to the “Cedar Tything Office.”196
October 28: Theodore Turley was mentioned in the ledger of the Deseret Iron Company. His account was debited $0.75 for an error in calculation.197
November 4: Theodore Turley was mentioned in the ledger of the Deseret Iron Company. His account was debited $5.37 for “2150 lbs Coal @ Bank.”198
November 11: “Sister Amelia Turley,” Theodore’s daughter-in-law, bore her testimony at the November meeting of the Cedar City Relief Society.199

Theodore Turley and his family moved from Cedar City to Washington, Utah.

1858
Washington County land records indicate Theodore Turley owned Lots 7 & 18 in the town of Washington along Machine Creek (later named Millcreek) beginning in 1858.200 Theodore operated a small gristmill on that property.201

1859
February 20: John D. Lee “delivered a lecture to the Saints” in Washington, Washington County, Utah, where he owned a residence. He was followed by Theodore Turley.202
October 6: Theodore Turley spoke at a General Conference of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in Salt Lake City. “Elder Theodore Turley bore testimony to the truth of the gospel of Jesus Christ; referred to the words of Daniel relative to the stone being cut out of the mountain without hands and spoke of the influences by which he had been surrounded; told his experience in California, while preaching the gospel there. President Heber C. Kimball spoke in high commendation of bro. Turley.”203 Heber C. Kimball said, “I have been much gratified to hear the remarks of brother Turley. And I was exceedingly pleased to see him this morning. I naturally love him, for he is a true man. He is as true as gold that has a little dross in it; there is a good deal of the true metal in him. We all more or less partake of the world, and the flesh, and the devil, and that is the dross which is in us.”204
December 11: Theodore Turley dined at the home of John D. Lee in Washington.205
December 17: Theodore Turley “of Washington” was among a number of speakers at a regional church conference held in Cedar City.206
December 31: Theodore Turley was mentioned in the ledger of the Deseret Iron Company. His account was debited $8.90 for 890 lbs of coke.207

1860
January 5: John D. Lee wrote in his diary, “Examined the Mill Property belonging to Bro. Theodore Turly & co.”208
January 6: John D. Lee wrote in his diary, “Bro. Turly made some proposition in the Sale of his property &c.”209
January 7: John D. Lee and Theodore Turley entered into a contract for the sale of Theodore’s property in Washington. John D. Lee recorded, “I finally Closed the Contract with Bro. Turley & co. at 500$ in Stock down for his Mill, Blacksmith Tools, land claim of 10 acres & all the improvements about the Premesies, the Mill to be delivered on the 16th inst.”210
February 22: John D. Lee purchased “a Double Barrel Shot Gun of T. Turley for a Pair of goats. I also bought about 150$ worth of Irons, Tools &c.”211
February 23: John D. Lee recorded the Turley family among a larger group of Washington residents moving to Minersville. “About 9 morning T. Turley, including Fred & Stephen Franklin & their Families, also Wm. Wood, McKnight, Jos. Glossop & Jno. Lee & their Families, & effects all roled out for Minersville, Beaver county.”212

Theodore Turley and his family moved from Washington to Minersville, Utah.

1860
March 12: John D. Lee recorded that, at his home in Harmony, he found “Stephen Franklin & 2 of Turley’s boys waiting for me to come to deliver them 700$ in stock &c. which was due them on the Mill property that I bought at Washington.”213
April 18: Theodore Turley was listed in the Beaver High Priest Quorum meeting minutes.214
May 4: John D. Lee recorded, “Last evening Bro. Rollins returned with about 50 goats. He also brought some for Me & by him I sent a Pair to Bro. T. Turley.”215
July 21: Theodore Turley was enumerated in Beaver, Beaver County, Utah, for the 1860 U.S. census. He was a fifty-nine-year-old farmer with real estate valued at $200 and personal estate valued at $700. Also in the household were Theodore’s wife, Ruth J., and their three children: fifteen-year-old Joseph, eight-year-old Omner, and four-year-old Alvin H. Enumerated next to the Theodore Turley family was the Stephen & Sarah E. Franklin and Frederick & Amelia Turley families. They all lived in Minersville at the time. (It appears that the census taker recorded all inhabitants of Beaver County as residing in Beaver City.)216

1862
April 20: A number of Theodore Turley’s children and grandchildren were recorded on a roster of students attending the Minersville School in 1862. These included two children of Theodore Turley and Ruth Jane Giles (Omner and Alvin), two children of Priscilla R. Turley and Amasa M. Lyman (Theodore and Ira), and one child of Sarah E. Turley and Stephen Franklin (Elizabeth).217
September 4: Theodore Turley gave the opening prayer in a meeting of the Beaver High Priests. President Brigham Young then addressed the quorum.218

1863
March 8: The Beaver High Priest meeting minutes noted, “Bro. Rollins and Turley of Minersville spoke…”219
June 27: While visiting in Minersville, Amasa Lyman “received a call from Father Theodore Turl[e]y who had sone some work for [him] during the day.”220

1864
July 12: Theodore Turley wrote a letter to his children in California. The letter was addressed from Minersville.221

Theodore Turley and his family moved from Minersville to Beaver, Utah.

1865
November 12: Theodore Turley moved to Beaver, Utah.222
November 25: Theodore Turley was officially received into the Beaver High Priest Quorum.223

1866
January 7: Theodore Turley bore testimony at a Beaver High Priests quorum meeting.224
February 4: Theodore Turley spoke at a Beaver High Priests meeting.225
June 25: Theodore Turley testified of God at a Beaver High Priests meeting.226
August 30: Theodore Turley prayed in a Beaver High Priests meeting and speaks about storing grain.227
October 14: Theodore Turley attended a Beaver High Priests meeting.228
November 15: Theodore Turley attended a Beaver High Priests meeting. He comments on evil practices in their midst.229
November 29: Theodore Turley attended a Beaver High Priests meeting. He comments on adultery punishment.230
December 23: Theodore Turley attended a Beaver High Priests meeting. He comments on the Word of Wisdom.231

1867
January: Theodore Turley recorded as a member of the Beaver High Priests Quorum.232
January 20: Theodore Turley attended a Beaver High Priests meeting. He spoke on the prosperity of the Church.233
February 3: Theodore Turley attended a Beaver High Priests meeting. He spoke on the sentiments of the Lord.234
March 17: Theodore Turley attended a Beaver High Priests meeting. He spoke on detecting good versus evil spirits.235
April 11: Theodore Turley attended a Beaver High Priests meeting and gave the closing prayer.236
April 28: Theodore Turley attended a Beaver High Priests meeting and commented on having the quorum settle its own problems.237
May 6: Theodore Turley attended a Beaver High Priests meeting where the change of quorum leadership directed by Brigham Young was discussed.238

1868
February 2: Theodore Turley attended a Beaver High Priests meeting.239
March 1: Theodore Turley attended a Beaver High Priests meeting.240
March 29: Theodore Turley attended a Beaver High Priests meeting.241
April 26: Theodore Turley attended a Beaver High Priests meeting.242
June 22: Theodore Turley attended a Beaver High Priests meeting.243
August 17: Theodore Turley attended a Beaver High Priests meeting.244
September 13: Theodore Turley attended a Beaver High Priests meeting.245

1869
March 1: Amasa Lyman called at the residence of Theodore Turley in Beaver, but he was “absent from home at the iron works.”246
June 15: Amasa Lyman lodged with Theodore Turley in Beaver.247
June 28: Amasa Lyman dined with Theodore Turley in Beaver.248
August 25: Amasa Lyman lodged with Theodore Turley in Beaver.249

1870
April 15: Beaver High Priest Quorum members were listed in the meeting minutes, but Theodore Turley’s name was crossed out.250
June 2: Amasa Lyman lodged with Theodore Turley in Beaver.251
June 5: Amasa Lyman lodged with Theodore Turley in Beaver.252
June 9: Amasa Lyman wrote a letter to “Brothers Harrison and Godbe.” He mentioned preaching in both Minersville and Beaver. “There will be meetings held here in favor of the Church of Zion, for the present under the supervision of Theodore Turley.” The letter was published in the June 18th edition of the Mormon Tribune (now Salt Lake Tribune).253
June 12: Theodore Turley was excommunicated or “cut off” from The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in Beaver. Robert Kershaw of Beaver wrote a letter the same day to “Bros. Harrison and Godbe” announcing Theodore’s excommunication and offering commentary: “Among those that have been cut off to-day is Theodore Turley,—a man that stands somewhat conspicuous im [sic] the history of this Church, and a member of between thirty and forty years standing. He is a man who was intimately acquainted with Joseph Smith in his life time, and one whose confidence has never been shaken in our founder.” Theodore was named a member of the new Church of Zion.254
June 14: William Fotheringham sent notice to the Deseret News of the excommunication of several Beaver citizens for apostasy. Theodore Turley’s name is among them. The notice is published in the June 23rd and June 29th editions of the Deseret News.255
July 17: Theodore was enumerated in Beaver, Beaver County, Utah, for the 1870 U.S. census. He was noted as a sixty-nine-year-old gunsmith with real estate valued at $250 and personal estate valued at $600. Also in the household were fifty-eight-year-old Ruth, eighteen-year-old Omner, and thirteen-year-old Alvin.256

1871
January 7: Theodore Turley arrived at Amasa Lyman’s home in Salt Lake City, Utah. Amasa recorded, “Father Turley ar[r]ived here to day in the stage from Beaver[.] he came to be treated for a cancer on his lower lip. He engaged the services of Dr. Roberts Magnetic Physician who agreed to treat his case for fifty dollars.”257
January 8: Amasa Lyman recorded that Theodore Turley was feeling “some bet[t]er this evening.”258
January 10: Amasa Lyman recorded that Theodore Turley’s health was no better.259
January 11: Amasa Lyman recorded that Theodore was “stil[l] improveing in health.”260
February 1: Amasa Lyman recorded that Theodore was “not quite so well.”261
February 9: Amasa Lyman visited Dr. Washington F. Anderson on Theodore Turley’s behalf, likely setting up Theodore’s surgery for the following day.262
February 10: Amasa Lyman recorded the details of Theodore’s surgery in Salt Lake City. “At 11 oclock Drs [Washington F.] Anderson and [Joseph M.] Benidict called and removed the cancer from the lip of Father [Theodore] Turley the operation was performed with the patient in his normal state.”263
March 3: Theodore Turley left Salt Lake City and “started for his home in Beaver in the stage.”264
March 19: Theodore wrote a letter to Louisa M. Lyman, first wife of Amasa Lyman, from Beaver, Utah. He thanked her for the care he received in her home during his stay in Salt Lake City. He explained that they had encountered a severe storm on his journey home. He also described the religious tensions in Beaver at that time.265
May 3: Amasa Lyman stopped at Theodore Turley’s home in Beaver.266
June 5: In Salt Lake City, Amasa Lyman called on Dr. Washington F. Anderson “and procured and sent some medicine to Father [Theodore] Turley.”267
August 18: Theodore Turley died of mouth cancer.268 He was later buried at Mountain View Cemetery in Beaver, Utah.269

  1. Created by Mary Ann Clements 16 April 2020. This timeline builds on previous compilations by family members Ann Laemmlen Lewis, David Roche Turley II (September 2016 Beaver/Minersville TTFO Field Trip), and Ferron L. Andersen (published in the October 2001 Theodore Turley Family Newsletter).
  2. There is some confusion as to whether Theodore Turley was born in 1800 or 1801. Theodore himself states a birth year of 1800 in his personal life sketch written c. 1840, in the 1 February 1840 entry in his mission journal, and on one of his handwritten family memorials. However, Theodore also stated an 1801 birth year in another handwritten family memorial. The 1801 date is also in his Nauvoo endowment record and Nauvoo Temple sealing record. The family has typically gone with the 1801 birth year due to his christening in May 1801 as well as his stated ages on U.S. Federal censuses in 1850 (taken in 1851), 1860, and 1870. Devery S. Anderson and Gary James Bergara, The Nauvoo Endowment Companies, 1845-1846: A Documentary History (Salt Lake City, Utah: Signature Books, 2005), p. 109; Nauvoo and sealing record “A”, 1846-1857, p. 523-524 and p.773-774, entries for Theodore Turley, FHL 183374.
  3. Birmingham, England, Church of England Baptisms, Marriages and Burials, 1538-1812, Birmingham, St. Martin, 1795-1811, baptism of Theodore son of William & Elizabeth Turley, 29 May 1801, image at Ancestry.com.
  4. In the 7 February 1840 entry of his 1840 mission journal, Theodore wrote that he visited his “old Master James Parkes.” Theodore’s grandson, Joseph Soll Turley, wrote in 1971 that he personally saw Theodore’s 1814 indenture record to “Samuel Parks, Stamper, Piercer, and Toolmaker.” If the name was abbreviated, it’s possible Joseph Soll Turley mistook Jams for Saml. James Parkes is listed as a “stamper and piercer” in the 1818 edition of Wrightson’s Triennial Directory of Birmingham, available on Ancestry.com. Records indicate that James Parkes began his company in 1815, shortly after Theodore was apprenticed. His company was later known for manufacturing microscopes and other scientific equipment.
  5. Life sketch written by Theodore Turley c. 1840.
  6. Family Memorial for Frances Kimberley; Birmingham, England, Church of England Marriages and Banns, 1754-1937, Harborne, St. Peter, 1820-1822, p. 69, no. 206, marriage of Theodore Turley and Frances Kimberley, 26 Nov. 1821, image at Ancestry.com.
  7. Family Memorial for Frances Kimberley; Birmingham, England, Church of England Baptisms, 1813-1919, Birmingham, St. Philip, 1821-1826, baptism of Theodore son of Theodore & Frances Turley , 26 Nov. 1822, image at Ancestry.com.
  8. Family Memorial for Frances Kimberley; Birmingham, England, Church of England Baptisms, 1813-1919, Birmingham, St. Philip, 1821-1826, baptism of Theodore son of Theodore & Frances Turley , 26 Nov. 1822, image at Ancestry.com.
  9. Page 142 of 1823 Wrightson’s Triennial Directory of Birmingham. UK, Midlands and Various UK Trade Directories, 1770-1941, Ancestry.com.
  10. The London Gazette, 26 November 1825, Issue 18197, p. 2176, The Gazette public records website; Aris’s Birmingham Gazette, Monday, 28 November 1825, p. 2, col. 5, accessed 15 April 2020, The British Newspaper Archive.
  11. There is some confusion on the year of birth for Frances A. Turley. The Family Memorial and her Nauvoo Temple sealing record both state that Frances was born on 1 January 1824. However, her 1826 christening record, Nauvoo endowment record, and Winter Quarters death record all indicate she was born on 1 January 1825.  London, England, Church of England Births and Baptisms, 1813-1920, Southwark, St. George the Martyr, 1823-1838, p. 225, no. 1795, baptism of Frances Amelia daughter of Theodore & Frances Thurley, 24 Aug. 1826, image at Ancestry.com; Devery S. Anderson and Gary James Bergara, The Nauvoo Endowment Companies, 1845-1846: A Documentary History (Salt Lake City, Utah: Signature Books, 2005), p. 109; Nauvoo and sealing record “A”, 1846-1857, p. 245-246, entry for Frances Amelia Turley, FHL 183374; Winter Quarters sexton’s records, 1846-1848, Record book, death of Frances A. Daniels, 1 Dec. 1846, image 14 of 51, LR 6359 24, Church History Library, https://catalog.churchofjesuschrist.org/assets/1647eb3e-6020-4669-91a2-603820678def/0/13, accessed July 2021.
  12. The London Gazette, 26 November 1825, Issue 18197, p. 2176, The Gazette public records website; Aris’s Birmingham Gazette, Monday, 28 November 1825, p. 2, col. 5, accessed 15 April 2020, The British Newspaper Archive.
  13. The Family Memorial states that Frances was registered at “St. Gorge’s Church Birminsey London.” Bermondsey is a district in Southwark, the same south London borough where St. George the Martyr church is located.  London, England, Church of England Births and Baptisms, 1813-1920, Southwark, St. George the Martyr, 1823-1838, p. 225, no. 1795, baptism of Frances Amelia daughter of Theodore & Frances Thurley, 24 Aug. 1826, image at Ancestry.com.
  14. Theodore noted in his life sketch (written c. 1840) that he immigrated to Canada in 1825. Given the August 1826 christening date of his daughter in London, he likely misremembered.
  15. The Colonial Advocate, Thursday, April 26, 1827, p. 2, col. 1, accessed 29 April 2020, Google News Archive, https://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=DQNrXyjhriIC&dat=18270426&printsec=frontpage&hl=en; Ann Laemmlen Lewis Timeline.
  16. Family Memorial for Frances Kimberley, Theodore noted in that memorial that Mary Ann’s birth was registered with the Methodist Episcopal Church in York, Upper Canada (now Toronto), but we have not yet located that record; Devery S. Anderson and Gary James Bergara, The Nauvoo Endowment Companies, 1845-1846: A Documentary History (Salt Lake City, Utah: Signature Books, 2005), p. 109; Nauvoo and sealing record “A”, 1846-1857, p. 577-578, entry for Mary Ann Turley, FHL 183374.
  17. Ann Laemmlen Lewis Timeline. An image of an anvil is later added to the advertisement. For an example of this later advertisement and a link to online images of the newspaper, see Canadian Newspapers.
  18. Family Memorial for Frances Kimberley; Devery S. Anderson and Gary James Bergara, The Nauvoo Endowment Companies, 1845-1846: A Documentary History (Salt Lake City, Utah: Signature Books, 2005), p. 109; Nauvoo and sealing record “A”, 1846-1857, p. 379-380, entry for Priscilla Rebecca Turley, FHL 183374.
  19. Ann Laemmlen Lewis Timeline. For an example of this advertisement and a link to online images of the newspaper, see Canadian Newspapers.
  20. Family Memorial for Frances Kimberley. Frederick was likely named after Theodore’s little brother, Frederick, who died in England just two years earlier in July 1830. He was only seventeen years old at the time of his death. For more information, see the Theodore Turley: A Biography newsletter installment by Richard E. Turley, Jr., “2: The Pre-Conversion Canadian Years.”
  21. See Richard E. Turley, “2: The Pre-Conversion Canadian Years,” Theodore Turley: A Biography newsletter series, citing Toronto Township Deeds No. 11149.
  22. It is unclear is Obia was a boy or a girl. Family Memorial for Frances Kimberley.
  23. Family Memorial for Frances Kimberley.
  24. Richard E. Turley, “2: The Pre-Conversion Canadian Years,” Theodore Turley: A Biography newsletter series.
  25. Family Memorial for Frances Kimberley.
  26. Although Theodore seems to suggest Parley P. Pratt baptized them in his personal life sketch written c. 1840, that is impossible; Pratt was in Kirtland, Ohio, on March 1st. See Richard E. Turley, Jr., “3: Joining the Latter-day Saints,” Theodore Turley: A Biography newsletter series.
  27. Historical Department journal history of the Church, 1830-2008; 1830-1839; 1837; Church History Library, accessed 27 April 2020, https://catalog.churchofjesuschrist.org/assets?id=d87cf687-399a-497c-889c-af5de8ea18ca&crate=0&index=51. See also Richard E. Turley, Jr., “4: Church Life in Canada, 1837-1838,” Theodore Turley: A Biography newsletter series.
  28. Toronto Township Deeds No. 14467.
  29. Transcription by Richard E. Turley, Jr., in “4: Church Life in Canada, 1837-1838,” Theodore Turley: A Biography newsletter series. See also Theodore’s personal history written circa 1840. Samuel Mulliner was baptized 10 September 1837 (FamilySearch ID KWJY-JSG). James Standing was baptized 24 September 1837 (FamilySearch ID KWV3-VYZ).
  30. View transcript of letter here. Russell, Isaac 1807-1844. Isaac Russell correspondence, accessed 15 April 2020, https://catalog.churchofjesuschrist.org/assets?id=8e24060e-2e53-46bf-8eb1-a3c6f5fd8949&crate=0&index=20. See also Richard E. Turley, Jr., “4: Church Life in Canada, 1837-1838,” Theodore Turley: A Biography newsletter series.
  31. Isaac Russell correspondence 1837-1840, Letter from William Law to Isaac Russell, 10 Nov. 1837, images 22-24 of 30, MS 6066, Church History Library, https://catalog.churchofjesuschrist.org/assets/8e24060e-2e53-46bf-8eb1-a3c6f5fd8949/0/21, accessed July 2021.
  32. Family Memorial for Frances Kimberley; Richard E. Turley, Jr., “4: Church Life in Canada, 1837-1838,” Theodore Turley: A Biography newsletter series.
  33. Richard E. Turley, Jr., “5: Gathering with the Saints, 1838,” Theodore Turley: A Biography newsletter series, citing Theodore’s missionary diary.
  34. Theodore recorded July 18th as the date of their arrival in his missionary diary. Joseph Smith’s journal recorded the arrival of Elder Almon W. Babbitt’s company on Saturday, July 28th. Richard E. Turley, Jr., “5: Gathering with the Saints, 1838,” Theodore Turley: A Biography newsletter series.
  35. See “Extermination Order” Church History Topic.
  36. The position was apparently temporary, as he did not appear on any other lists of Far West High Council members. MInute Book 2, p. 175, 19 Dec. 1838, ID #7235, Church History Library, https://www.josephsmithpapers.org/paper-summary/minute-book-2/177, accessed July 2021.
  37. Biography at the Joseph Smith Papers website, citing Nauvoo Seventies List. Compiled by Nauvoo Restoration. 3 vols. (Salt Lake City, Utah: By the author, n.d.).
  38. This committee was also assigned to “draft a preamble and resolution” regarding the violation of the constitutional rights of the Far West Saints. The seven members of this committee were John Taylor, Alanson Ripley, Brigham Young, Theodore Turley, Heber C. Kimball, John Smith, and Don C. Smith. Far West Committee minutes, 1839 January-April, 26 Jan. 1839, image 2 of 38, Church History Library, https://catalog.churchofjesuschrist.org/assets/b4a7fd1f-54f4-42be-a64c-0e16535d72f1/0/1, accessed July 2021.
  39. The seven members of the committee of removal were William Huntington, Charles Bird, Alanson Ripley, Theodore Turley, Daniel Shearer, Shadrach Roundy, and Jonathan H. Hale. Far West Committee minutes, 1839 January-April, 29 Jan. 1839, image 5 of 38, Church History Library, https://catalog.churchofjesuschrist.org/assets/b4a7fd1f-54f4-42be-a64c-0e16535d72f1/0/4, accessed July 2021.
  40. History, 1838–1856, volume C-1 [2 November 1838–31 July 1842], p. 912, ID #7513, Church History Library, https://www.josephsmithpapers.org/paper-summary/history-1838-1856-volume-c-1-2-november-1838-31-july-1842/94, accessed July 2021.
  41. History, 1838–1856, volume C-1 [2 November 1838–31 July 1842], p. 914, ID #7513, Church History Library, https://www.josephsmithpapers.org/paper-summary/history-1838-1856-volume-c-1-2-november-1838-31-july-1842/96, accessed July 2021.
  42. See Theodore Turley: A Biography installment 9: Prophecy Fulfilled, 18-26 April 1839.
  43. “As the Saints were passing away from the meeting, Brother [Theodore] Turley said to [John E.] Page and [Wilford] Woodruff, “stop a bit while I bid Isaac Russell good bye” and knocking at his door called brother Russell! his wife answered “come in it is brother Turley” Russel replied “it is not he left here two weeks ago” and appeared quite alarmed but on finding it was Turley asked him to sit down, but he replied “I cannot I shall loose my company” who is your company? inquired Russel “the Twelve” “The Twelve” “Yes dont you know that this is the twenty sixth and the day the Twelve were to take leave of their friends on the foundation of the Lord’s House to go to the Islands of the Sea? The Revelation is now fulfilled, and I am going with them. Russel was speechless and Turley bid him, Farewell.” History, 1838-1856, volume C-1 [2 November 1838-31 July 1842], addenda p. 14, ID #7513, Church History Library, https://www.josephsmithpapers.org/paper-summary/history-1838-1856-volume-c-1-2-november-1838-31-july-1842/549, accessed July 2021; See alsoTheodore Turley: A Biography installment 9: Prophecy Fulfilled, 18-26 April 1839.
  44. Minutes, 6 May 1839 in Letterbook 2, p. 143, ID #7812, Church History Library, https://www.josephsmithpapers.org/paper-summary/letterbook-2/148, accessed July 2021.
  45. Theodore stated that, after completing his home, he was confined for eleven weeks due to the “Western Chill fever.” He left on his mission on 21 Sep. 1839. Theodore Turley mission journal 1839-1840, p. 4-5, Mormon Missionary Diaries digital collection, BYU Library, https://contentdm.lib.byu.edu/digital/collection/MMD/id/59510, accessed July 2021; “History of Joseph Smith. May, 1839,” The Deseret News, Thursday, 13 Apr. 1854, p. 1, col. 4, Newspapers.com.
  46. “Sunday 16th Meeting held br Bosiers [Squire Bozarth’s] Brs Rose and [Theodore] Turley presiding” JS Collection, Journal, 1839, p. 3, ID #661, Church History Library, https://www.josephsmithpapers.org/paper-summary/journal-1839/4, accessed July 2021.
  47. James Mulholland Journal, 1838 September 3-October 6, 1839 April 22-October 20, image 9 of 24, Joseph Smith collection 1827-1844, MS 155, Church History Library, https://catalog.churchofjesuschrist.org/assets/5c2d3512-9739-4648-96cf-c4458d5e5d72/0/8, accessed July 2021; “History of Joseph Smith. May, 1839,” The Deseret News, Thursday, 13 Apr. 1854, p. 1, col. 4, Newspapers.com. See also 11: The First House Built by a Saint in Nauvoo, 11 June to 18 July 1839 by Richard E. Turley, Jr.
  48. Theodore Turley mission journal 1839-1840, p. 1., Mormon Missionary Diaries digital collection, BYU Library, https://contentdm.lib.byu.edu/digital/collection/MMD/id/59506/rec/2, accessed July 2021.
  49. See 23: Imprisoned.
  50. Family Memorial for Frances Kimberley.
  51. Letter from Brigham Young, 7 May 1840, copied in JS Letterbook 2, p. 151-153, ID #541, Church History Library, https://www.josephsmithpapers.org/paper-summary/letter-from-brigham-young-7-may-1840/3, accessed July 2021.
  52. See 26: Free at Last.
  53. Joseph Fielding journal, 28 Jul. 1840; John Needham journal, p. 40, https://catalog.churchofjesuschrist.org/assets/739b6a97-8fe0-4d99-85a2-6bff7a637652/0/49.
  54. Joseph Fielding journal, 29-30 Jul. 1840; John Needham journal, p. 40, https://catalog.churchofjesuschrist.org/assets/739b6a97-8fe0-4d99-85a2-6bff7a637652/0/49.
  55. John Needham journal, p. 40, https://catalog.churchofjesuschrist.org/assets/739b6a97-8fe0-4d99-85a2-6bff7a637652/0/49.
  56. John Needham journal, p. 40, https://catalog.churchofjesuschrist.org/assets/739b6a97-8fe0-4d99-85a2-6bff7a637652/0/49.
  57. John Needham journal, p. 41, https://catalog.churchofjesuschrist.org/assets/739b6a97-8fe0-4d99-85a2-6bff7a637652/0/50.
  58. John Needham journal, p. 42, https://catalog.churchofjesuschrist.org/assets/739b6a97-8fe0-4d99-85a2-6bff7a637652/0/51.
  59. The letter was likely from Wilford Woodruff, who wrote to him on August 3rd. Wilford Woodruff journal, 3 Aug. 1840; John Needham journal, p. 42, https://catalog.churchofjesuschrist.org/assets/739b6a97-8fe0-4d99-85a2-6bff7a637652/0/51.
  60. Wilford Woodruff journal, 9 Aug. 1840.
  61. Wilford Woodruff journal, 10 Aug. 1840.
  62. Wilford Woodruff journal, 11 Aug. 1840.
  63. John Needham journal, p. 48, https://catalog.churchofjesuschrist.org/assets/739b6a97-8fe0-4d99-85a2-6bff7a637652/0/57.
  64. William Clayton journal, 4 Sep. 1840.
  65. In a letter to the Twelve Apostles dated 15 Dec. 1840, Joseph Smith stated, “I have had the pleasure of welcoming about one hundred brethren of the brethren from England who came with Elder [Theodore] Turley, the remainder I am informed stop[p]ed in Kirtland, not having means to get any further. I think those that came here this fall did not take the best possible rout, or the least expensive. Most of the brethren have obtained employment of one kind or another and appear tolerably well contented, and seemed disposed to hearken to council.” William Clayton Journal, 24 November 1840; Letter to the Council of the Twelve, 15 December 1840, in Letterbook 2, Item #7812, Church History Library, https://www.josephsmithpapers.org/paper-summary/letterbook-2/199, accessed July 2021.
  66. The four charges were as follows (edits from the published transcript by John S. Dinger): (1) “For unchristian conduct while on the sea [and] for romping and kising the females and dancing”; (2) “For sleeping with two females coming up the Lakes and on the road to Dixons ferry”; (3) “For not settling with the brethren for what money he received of them, and taking the lumber from the boat without leave”; and (4) “For threatening the brethren that Brother Joseph [Smith] would not hear any thing that they would not tell him about[,] for he was of the same spirit and signified the same Priesthood[,] signifying if they told him he would not hear [believe] them.” John S. Dinger, ed., The Nauvoo City and High Council Minutes (Salt Lake City: Signature Books, 2011), p. 388-389.
  67. “United States Census, 1840,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:XHB8-X61 : 15 August 2017), Thedr Turley, Hancock, Illinois, United States, accessed 8 April 2020; Stanley B. Kimball, Sources of Mormon History in Illinois, 1839-48: An Annotated Catalog of the Microfilm Collection at Southern Illinois University, 2nd ed. (Carbondale, Ill.: Central Publications, 1966), 19, accessed 8 April 2020, http://www.siue.edu/lovejoy-library/tas/Kimball_Sources.pdf. Related blog post: “Celebrating the U.S. Census with Theodore Turley’s Census Records.”
  68. John S. Dinger, ed., The Nauvoo City and High Council Minutes (Salt Lake City: Signature Books, 2011), p. 20.
  69. The family has traditionally dated Theodore’s marriage as “prior to 1842” (The Theodore Turley Family Book) or January 1842. This places the marriage comfortably before the birth of Mary Clift‘s son, Jason, in October of that year. Theodore records the son as “Jason Turley” in the Family Memorial for Mary Clift. Historians such as Gary James Bergara and George D. Smith point out, however, that a case brought before the Nauvoo High Council in September 1842 confirms Jason was the illegitimate child of Mary Clift and Gustavus Hills. Gustavus Hills even agreed to support Mary Clift and the child financially in a paternity suit afterwards. Some family researchers assert that the early plural marriage between Theodore Turley and Mary Clift is still likely, and that the high council case could have been an elaborate scheme to hide the early practice of plural marriage in Nauvoo. For one argument that Theodore Turley may have been exposed to the idea of plural marriage as early as 1839, see the chapter “Polygamy” in Theodore Turley: A Biography by Richard E. Turley, Jr. For accounts arguing that family members “antedated” the marriage to make Mary Clift‘s child look legitimate, see Gary James Bergara, “‘Illicit Intercourse,’ Plural Marriage, and the Nauvoo Stake High Council, 1840-1844,” John Whitmer Historical Association Journal 23 (2003): 75-77; George D. Smith, Nauvoo Polygamy: “…But We Called It Celestial Marriage” 2nd ed. (Salt Lake City: Signature Books, 2011), Kindle location 6846-6865.
  70. Freemasons; Nauvoo Lodge (Ill.). Freemasons minutebook , https://catalog.churchofjesuschrist.org/assets?id=dafc2c46-c417-41d2-a25f-fceb98ca2f09&crate=0&index=37 (accessed: April 15, 2020)
  71. Freemasons; Nauvoo Lodge (Ill.). Freemasons minutebook , https://catalog.churchofjesuschrist.org/assets?id=dafc2c46-c417-41d2-a25f-fceb98ca2f09&crate=0&index=38 (accessed: April 15, 2020)
  72. Freemasons; Nauvoo Lodge (Ill.). Freemasons minutebook , https://catalog.churchofjesuschrist.org/assets?id=dafc2c46-c417-41d2-a25f-fceb98ca2f09&crate=0&index=43 (accessed: April 15, 2020).
  73. John S. Dinger, ed., The Nauvoo City and High Council Minutes (Salt Lake City: Signature Books, 2011), p. 424-426; Gary James Bergara, “‘Illicit Intercourse,’ Plural Marriage, and the Nauvoo Stake High Council, 1840-1844,” John Whitmer Historical Association Journal 23 (2003): 75-77.
  74. Gary James Bergara, “‘Illicit Intercourse,’ Plural Marriage, and the Nauvoo Stake High Council, 1840-1844,” John Whitmer Historical Association Journal 23 (2003): 76-77. A transcript of the agreement is available online here.
  75. Family Memorial for Frances Kimberley.
  76. Nauvoo, IL, Records, 1841-1845, Claim from Theodore Turley, circa 26 September 1842, ID #14684, Church History Library, https://www.josephsmithpapers.org/paper-summary/claim-from-theodore-turley-circa-26-september-1842/1, accessed July 2021.
  77. Theodore Turley recorded his name as “Jason Turley” on his later Family Memorial-Mary Clift. He was recorded as Jason L. Clift in the Nauvoo sexton death records, which said he was one year and six days old at the time of his death on 26 October 1843. Fred E. Woods, “Nauvoo Cemetery Record of William D. Huntington, Nauvoo Sexton,” Mormon Historical Studies 3, no. 1 (Spring 2002): 138.
  78. John S. Dinger, ed., The Nauvoo City and High Council Minutes (Salt Lake City: Signature Books, 2011), p. 163.
  79. Journal, December 1842-June 1844, Book 1, 21 December 1842-10 March 1843, pages 278 and 284, ID #7997, Church History Library, https://www.josephsmithpapers.org/paper-summary/journal-december-1842-june-1844-book-1-21-december-1842-10-march-1843/286, accessed July 2021.
  80. Biography at the Joseph Smith Papers website, citing Leonard, Glen M. Nauvoo: A Place of Peace, a People of Promise. Salt Lake City: Deseret Book; Provo, UT: Brigham Young University Press, 2002.
  81. Family Memorial-Mary Clift; Fred E. Woods, “Nauvoo Cemetery Record of William D. Huntington, Nauvoo Sexton,” Mormon Historical Studies 3, no. 1 (Spring 2002): 138.
  82. Nauvoo, IL, Records, 1841-1845, Claim from Theodore Turley, 27 October 1843, ID #14860, Church History Library, https://www.josephsmithpapers.org/paper-summary/claim-from-theodore-turley-27-october-1843/1, accessed July 2021.
  83. Nauvoo Neighbor, Wednesday, 27 Dec. 1843, p. 3, col. 3, Archive.org, https://archive.org/details/NauvooNeighbor18431845/page/n139/mode/1up, accessed June 2020.
  84. Nauvoo Registry of Deeds, Book B, 111-112, no. 345, Deed to Theodore Turley, 25 January 1844, ID #7208, https://www.josephsmithpapers.org/paper-summary/deed-to-theodore-turley-25-january-1844/1, accessed July 2021.
  85. Traditional family information from The Theodore Turley Family Book. Do we have a source? Eliza later testified that her 1841 marriage with George Gardner Fidler lasted through February 1845. She claimed that George abandoned her and their two daughters in Galena, Illinois, at that time. Scott Co., Iowa, Divorce records, 1837-1940, case no. 967, Eliza C. Fidler v. George G. Fidler, image at FamilySearch.org, FHL 1643738.
  86. Nauvoo, IL, Records, 1841-1845, Statement of Account from Theodore Turley, 2 April 1844, ID #14954, Church History Library, https://www.josephsmithpapers.org/paper-summary/statement-of-account-from-theodore-turley-2-april-1844/1, accessed July 2021.
  87. Family Memorial for Sarah Ellen Clift.
  88. John S. Dinger, ed., The Nauvoo City and High Council Minutes (Salt Lake City: Signature Books, 2011), p. 240.
  89. “The Trades,” Nauvoo Neighbor, Wednesday, 16 Oct. 1844, p. 2, col. 5, Archive.org, https://archive.org/details/NauvooNeighbor18431845/page/n337/mode/1up, accessed July 2021.
  90. Juanita Brooks, ed., On the Mormon Frontier: The Diary of Hosea Stout 1844-1861 (Salt Lake City, Ut.: University of Utah Press, 1964), 5.
  91. Church historians suggested that Theodore’s name may have been considered because the gunsmith “had previously procured weapons for the Nauvoo Legion and was a prominent member of the local trade council.” They also cited Theodore’s work with apostles in the British Mission. Matthew J. Grow, Ronald K. Esplin, Mark Ashhurst-McGee, Gerrit J. Dirkmaat, Jeffrey D. Mahas, vol. eds., Council of Fifty minutes, March 1844-January 1846 (Salt Lake City, Utah: The Church Historian’s Press, 2016), 228 and footnote 117 at bottom of that page.
  92. Family Memorial for Mary Clift.
  93. Grow et al., Council of Fifty minutes, 253; Biography at the Joseph Smith Papers website.
  94. Grow et al., Council of Fifty minutes, 276.
  95. Cyrus Daniels married Frances Amelia Turley on 24 Jan. 1846. Grow et al., Council of Fifty minutes, 298.
  96. “Fifteen-shooters” or “harmonica” guns were popular firearms of the day thanks to improvements by Jonathan Browning that increased their reliability. “The basis of the design was a metal bar, shaped like a harmonica and holding from five to twenty-five charges of ball and powder. A lever forced the bar against the rear of the barrel. After firing, the lever was released and the slide was manually advanced to the next hole. The arms were popular since it was possible to carry extra loaded slides.” Grow et al., Council of Fifty minutes, 346; Harry W. Gibson, “Frontier Arms of the Mormons,” Utah Historical Quarterly Vol. 42 (1974), No. 1, p. 8, https://issuu.com/utah10/docs/uhq_volume42_1974_number1/s/113480, accessed July 2021.
  97. The chairman appointed Genl. C. C. Rich, Genl. A. P. Rockwood & Lieut Col. T. Turley to be said committee.” Grow et al., Council of Fifty minutes, 347.
  98. At the 18 Mar. 1845 meeting of the Council of Fifty, Theodore was charged with making “fifteen shooters and Bowie Knives.” “Polyglot Rifles,” Nauvoo Neighbor, Wednesday, 30 Apr. 1845, p. 2, col. 4, Archive.org, https://archive.org/details/NauvooNeighbor18431845/page/n447/mode/1up, accessed July 2021; Grow et al., Council of Fifty minutes, 346.
  99. The ad also ran in the 11 Jun. 1845 and 18 Jun. 1845 editions of the paper. “Wanted,” Nauvoo Neighbor, Wednesday, 4 Jun. 1845, p. 3, col. 4, Archive.org, https://archive.org/details/NauvooNeighbor18431845/page/n468/mode/1up, accessed July 2021.
  100. Family Memorial for Mary Clift.
  101. Family Memorial for Sarah Ellen Clift; Winter Quarters sexton’s records, 1846-1848; Record book; Church History Library, https://catalog.churchofjesuschrist.org/assets?id=1647eb3e-6020-4669-91a2-603820678def&crate=0&index=39 (accessed: April 15, 2020).
  102. Historical Department journal history of the Church, 1830-2008; 1840-1849; 1845; Church History Library, accessed 27 April 2020, https://catalog.churchofjesuschrist.org/assets?id=2987565f-96fb-470c-88c0-08c3ec43e3fe&crate=0&index=460.
  103. Devery S. Anderson and Gary James Bergara, The Nauvoo Endowment Companies, 1845-1846: A Documentary History (Salt Lake City, Utah: Signature Books, 2005), p. 25-26. Lucian was the son of Judge James Adams (1783-1843), a Mormon convert and a good friend to Joseph Smith. For more information on Adams, see Susan Easton Black, “James Adams of Springfield, Illinois: The Link between Abraham Lincoln and Joseph Smith,” Mormon Historical Studies (Spring 2009), vol. 10, no. 1, p. 33-49.
  104. Later records put Theodore’s indictment on the same day as the others (December 18th). “Record Group 206 Records of the Solicitor of the Treasury: Records relating to the indictment in Illinois of Brigham Young and Other Apostles of the Mormon Church on Charges of Counterfeiting, 1845-1848,” Photocopies available on Archive.org, accessed 27 April 2020, https://archive.org/details/RecordGroup206AndRecordGroup46/page/n115/mode/2up.
  105. “[A]t 6 o’clock a report came to Pres[ident]. Young that Theodore Turley had arrived in town, being liberated on bail of 250 dollars for his appearance at court next term; provided a bill of indictment should be found. report brought by Henry W. Miller.” Devery S. Anderson and Gary James Bergara, The Nauvoo Endowment Companies, 1845-1846: A Documentary History (Salt Lake City, Utah: Signature Books, 2005), p. 79-80. Lucian B. Adams and Nicholas Groesbeck are both listed as sureties in the U.S. District Attorney reports when the judgment is brought against them in the June 1846 term. “Record Group 206 Records of the Solicitor of the Treasury: Records relating to the indictment in Illinois of Brigham Young and Other Apostles of the Mormon Church on Charges of Counterfeiting, 1845-1848,” Photocopies available on Archive.org, accessed 27 April 2020, https://archive.org/details/RecordGroup206AndRecordGroup46/page/n121/mode/1up. Groesbeck is recorded as a bondsman for Joseph Smith in a family history account. Nicholas Groesbeck Morgan, Sr., Nicholas Groesbeck, September 5, 1819, June 29, 1884, published privately by the Groesbeck family, p. 6, digital reproduction available at Archive.org, accessed 27 April 2020, https://archive.org/details/nicholasgroesbec00morg/page/n19/mode/2up.
  106. Devery S. Anderson and Gary James Bergara, The Nauvoo Endowment Companies, 1845-1846: A Documentary History (Salt Lake City, Utah: Signature Books, 2005), p. 109.
  107. Gary James Bergara, “Identifying the Earliest Mormon Polygamists, 1841-44,” Dialogue: A Journal of Mormon Thought, Vol. 38 No. 3 (Fall 2005), p. 49.
  108. Nauvoo and sealing record “A”, 1846-1857, p. 379-380, entries for Amasa M. Lyman and Priscilla Rebecca Turley, FHL 183374.
  109. Family Memorial for Sarah Ellen Clift; Nauvoo and sealing record “A”, 1846-1857, p. 523-524, entries for Theodore Turley, Frances Kimberley, and Sarah Ellen Clift, FHL 183374.
  110. Nauvoo and sealing record “A”, 1846-1857, p. 245-246, entries for Cyrus Daniels and Frances Amelia Turley, FHL 183374.
  111. Theodore misstated the date of his sealing to Mary Clift on his Family Memorial. He recorded the sealing as 19 Jan. 1846 which was the date he was sealed to Frances Kimberley and Sarah Ellen Clift. Nauvoo and sealing record “A”, 1846-1857, p. 523-524, entries for Theodore Turley, Eliza Clift, and Mary Clift, FHL 183374.
  112. Nauvoo and sealing record “A”, 1846-1857, p. 577-578, entry for Brigham Young and Mary Ann Turley, FHL 183374.
  113. Juanita Brooks, ed., On the Mormon Frontier: The Diary of Hosea Stout 1844-1861 (Salt Lake City, Ut.: University of Utah Press, 1964), 126.
  114. Eliza Maria Partridge Lyman Journal.
  115. Do we have a source for this? Turley family researcher John R. Pyper added the death location near Lick Creek/Farmington, Van Buren County, Iowa, to Ancestral File in 1999. His explanation, published on p. 23 of the October 2000 TTFO Newsletter, was that the “Journal History of the Church states that Theodore and families were in that vicinity at the time of Henrietta’s death.”
  116. Journal History of the Church, 10 March 1846.
  117. Juanita Brooks, ed., On the Mormon Frontier: The Diary of Hosea Stout 1844-1861 (Salt Lake City, Ut.: University of Utah Press, 1964), 139.
  118. William Huntington Diary, 10 April 1846.
  119. Family Memorial.
  120. Eliza R. Snow trail diary, 13 May 1846. See Ann Lewis’ blog post “Jonathan Turley b. 13 September 1842, Nauvoo.”
  121. “Record Group 206 Records of the Solicitor of the Treasury: Records relating to the indictment in Illinois of Brigham Young and Other Apostles of the Mormon Church on Charges of Counterfeiting, 1845-1848,” Photocopies available on Archive.org, accessed 27 April 2020, https://archive.org/details/RecordGroup206AndRecordGroup46/page/n121/mode/1up.
  122. Family Memorial for Sarah Ellen Clift; Winter Quarters sexton’s records, 1846-1848; Record book; Church History Library, https://catalog.churchofjesuschrist.org/assets?id=1647eb3e-6020-4669-91a2-603820678def&crate=0&index=39 (accessed: April 15, 2020)
  123. Family Memorial; Winter Quarters sexton’s records, 1846-1848, Record book, deaths of Frances A. Daniels and Frances [F?] Daniels, 1 Dec. 1846, image 14 of 51, LR 6359 24, Church History Library, https://catalog.churchofjesuschrist.org/assets/1647eb3e-6020-4669-91a2-603820678def/0/13, accessed July 2021.
  124. Family memorial-Sarah Ellen Clift; Winter Quarters sexton’s records, 1846-1848; Record book; Church History Library, https://catalog.churchofjesuschrist.org/assets?id=1647eb3e-6020-4669-91a2-603820678def&crate=0&index=22 for Joseph Smith Turley and https://catalog.churchofjesuschrist.org/assets?id=1647eb3e-6020-4669-91a2-603820678def&crate=0&index=28 for Hyrum Smith Turley (accessed: April 15, 2020).
  125. Family Memorial for Sarah Ellen Clift; Winter Quarters sexton’s records, 1846-1848; Record book; Church History Library, https://catalog.churchofjesuschrist.org/assets?id=1647eb3e-6020-4669-91a2-603820678def&crate=0&index=22 (accessed: April 15, 2020).
  126. Family Memorial for Sarah Ellen Clift; Winter Quarters sexton’s records, 1846-1848; Record book; Church History Library, https://catalog.churchofjesuschrist.org/assets?id=1647eb3e-6020-4669-91a2-603820678def&crate=0&index=28 (accessed: April 15, 2020).
  127. Family Memorial-Sarah Ellen Clift; Winter Quarters sexton’s records, 1846-1848; Record book; Church History Library, https://catalog.churchofjesuschrist.org/assets?id=1647eb3e-6020-4669-91a2-603820678def&crate=0&index=28 (accessed: April 15, 2020).
  128. Family Memorial; Winter Quarters sexton’s records, 1846-1848; Record book; Church History Library, https://catalog.churchofjesuschrist.org/assets?id=1647eb3e-6020-4669-91a2-603820678def&crate=0&index=38 (accessed: April 15, 2020).
  129. History of the Church, vol. 7, p. 620, accessed online 28 April 2020, https://byustudies.byu.edu/content/volume-7-chapter-41.
  130. Family Memorial-Mary Clift.
  131. View transcript here. Brigham Young office files, 1832-1878 (bulk 1844-1877); General Correspondence, Incoming, 1840-1877; General Letters, 1840- 1877; S-Y, 1848; Theodore Turley letter; Church History Library, https://catalog.churchofjesuschrist.org/assets?id=e7243170-5bae-49ce-ae88-549a83702a95&crate=0&index=0 (accessed: April 15, 2020).
  132. Family Memorial for Mary Clift.
  133. According to the Pioneer Overland Travel Website, the Silas Richards Company departed Council Bluffs, Iowa, on 10 July 1849 and arrived in the Salt Lake Valley 25-29 October 1849. See https://history.lds.org/overlandtravel/companies/5/silas-richards-company-1849.
  134. Related blog post: “In the Valley of the Great Salt Lake.”
  135. Family Memorial for Mary Clift. Related blog post: “In the Valley of the Great Salt Lake.”
  136. Family Memorial for Mary Clift; Utah, Salt Lake City Cemetery Records, 1847-1896, Record of the Dead Book A, p. 2, interment no. 37, Mary Turley, 30 Mar. 1850, image 7 of digital film 7420258 at FamilySearch.org, digitized from FHL 1299167, https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QS7-L9CR-TBBP?i=6&cc=2094273&cat=23661, accessed March 2021. Related blog post: “In the Valley of the Great Salt Lake.”
  137. Entry for Sunday, 31 Mar. 1850. Juanita Brooks, ed., On the Mormon Frontier: The Diary of Hosea Stout ,1844-1861 Vol. 2 (Salt Lake City, Utah: University of Utah Press & Utah State Historical Society, 1964), 365; Family Memorial for Mary Clift; Utah, Salt Lake City Cemetery Records, 1847-1896, Record of the Dead Book A, p. 2, interment no. 37, Mary Turley, 30 Mar. 1850, image 7 of digital film 7420258 at FamilySearch.org, digitized from FHL 1299167, https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QS7-L9CR-TBBP?i=6&cc=2094273&cat=23661, accessed March 2021.
  138. Nauvoo and sealing record “A”, 1846-1857, p. 773-774, sealing and marriage entry for Theodore Turley and Ruth Jane Giles, FHL 183374. Related blog post: “In the Valley of the Great Salt Lake.”
  139. Source citation: “Utah State Archives Indexes,” database and images, Utah State Archives (https://archives.utah.gov/research/indexes: accessed April 15, 2020), Department of Agriculture and Food. Division of Animal Industry Brand books, Series 540. Related blog post: “In the Valley of the Great Salt Lake.”
  140. Deseret News [Salt Lake City, UT], 28 Dec. 1850, 6. Digitized by J. Willard Marriott Library, University of Utah: https://newspapers.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s69g6g6w/2569129 (accessed April 15, 2020). Related blog post: “In the Valley of the Great Salt Lake.”
  141. Jeffrey Ogden Johnson, “Determining and Defining ‘Wife’: The Brigham Young Households.” Dialogue: A Journal of Mormon Thought 20, no. 3 (Fall 1987): p. 63 and p. 68 Footnote 38. A story related years later by Mary Ann’s sister, Sarah, to Joseph Soll Turley suggests Mary Ann was not happy in the relationship (1971 letter from Joseph Soll Turley). In contrast, Mary Ann’s younger sister, Priscilla, who also became a plural wife in Nauvoo, moved into her husband Amasa Mason Lyman’s household shortly after evacuating Nauvoo in March 1846.
  142. Theodore’s notices about the lost heifer are published through February, suggesting he didn’t move till after that point. Lyman Homiston/Harmiston (1778-1859) was in the Edward Hunter Company, which arrived in the valley on 13 October 1850. See the Pioneer Overland Travel Website for more information on Lyman Homiston or the Edward Hunter Company: https://history.churchofjesuschrist.org/overlandtravel/pioneers/5572/lyman-harmiston.
  143. 1850 U.S. census, Utah Territory, Utah Co., family 65, Ruth Turley in household of Theodore Turley, image on Ancestry.com; “The Seventh Census of the United States: Utah and Slavery,” Utah Historical Quarterly Web Extra (Spring 2017), accessed 8 April 2020, https://history.utah.gov/repository-item/the-seventh-census-of-the-united-states-utah-and-slavery-spring-2017/. Related blog posts: “In the Valley of the Great Salt Lake” and “Celebrating the U.S. Census with Theodore Turley’s Census Records.”
  144. Amasa M. Lyman diary, 8 Jun. 1851.
  145. Mary Ann divorced her first husband, Brigham Young, on 15 Jan. 1851. We still need to confirm the date of Mary Ann’s marriage, but later histories of the area corroborate that Mary Ann Turley & John Cook were one of three couples that were married at Sycamore Grove prior to the larger group entering the city. Jeffrey Ogden Johnson, “Determining and Defining ‘Wife’: The Brigham Young Households.” Dialogue: A Journal of Mormon Thought 20, no. 3 (Fall 1987): p. 63 and p. 68 Footnote 38;  “Pioneers,” San Bernardino Daily Sun, Sunday 7 Mar. 1915, p. 4, col. 4, Newspapers.com.
  146. Idaho Death Certificates, 1911-1937, Filing no 46291-29000 (1924-1925), no. 46925, death cert. of Omner Turley, 22 Sep. 1924, image 641 of digital film 4192452 at FamilySearch.org, https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:S3HT-6SKQ-QPH, accessed July 2021.
  147. Although The Theodore Turley Family book has a marriage year of 1855, a life sketch written shortly after the 1898 death of Stephen Franklin indicated he arrived in San Bernardino in 1852 and he and Sarah were married in 1853. A marriage record has not yet been located. “[Wh]at the Pioneers Have Been Doing,” The Daily Sun, San Bernardino, Calif., Sunday, 17 Apr. 1898, p. 3, col. 3, Newspapers.com.
  148. “The first official record of our schools that we now have is a report of the school commissioners of San Bernardino, November 17, 1853. Theodore Turley, James H. Rollins, David Seeley, school commissioners.” “Doings of the Pioneers,” San Bernardino Daily Sun, Monday, 17 Jan. 1921, p. 4, col. 3-4, Newspapers.com.
  149. Amasa M. Lyman diary, 27 Mar. 1854
  150. Amasa M. Lyman diary, 16 Apr. 1854.
  151. Amasa M. Lyman diary, 5 Jun. 1854.
  152. Amasa M. Lyman diary, 22 Oct. 1854.
  153. Amasa M. Lyman diary, 1 Nov. 1854.
  154. Amasa M. Lyman diary, 21 Nov. 1854.
  155. Quicksilver (mercury) was often used in mining to extract silver or gold from ore. Amasa M. Lyman diary, 22 Nov. 1854.
  156. Amasa M. Lyman diary, 25 Dec. 1854.
  157. “Fifty to Seek Citizenship at Hearing Oct. 7th.” The San Bernardino County Sun, 13 Sept. 1931, p. 7. Related blog post: “Theodore Turley Gains U.S. Citizenship.”
  158. Caroline B. Crosby diary, 5 Sep. 1855. Edward Leo Lyman, Susan Ward Payne, and E. George Ellsworth, eds., No Place to Call Home: the 1807-1857 Life Writings of Caroline Barnes Crosby, Chronicler of Outlying Mormon Communities (Logan, Utah: Utah State University Press, 2005), 349.
  159. Caroline B. Crosby diary, 6 Sep. 1855. Lyman, Payne, Ellsworth, No Place to Call Home, 349.
  160. Caroline B. Crosby diary, 7 Sep. 1855. Lyman, Payne, Ellsworth, No Place to Call Home, 349.
  161. Caroline B. Crosby diary, 9 Sep. 1855. Lyman, Payne, Ellsworth, No Place to Call Home, 350.
  162. Caroline B. Crosby diary, 13 Sep. 1855. Lyman, Payne, and Ellsworth, No Place to Call Home, 350.
  163. Caroline B. Crosby diary, 17 Sep. 1855. Lyman, Payne, Ellsworth, No Place to Call Home, 351.
  164. Caroline B. Crosby diary, 18 Sep. 1855. Lyman, Payne, Ellsworth, No Place to Call Home, 351.
  165. Caroline B. Crosby diary, 20 Sep. 1855. Lyman, Payne, Ellsworth, No Place to Call Home, 352.
  166. “Jacob Bushman, Autobiography, Typescript, BYU, 1943” available at Ann Lewis’ family history blog.
  167. “Theodore Turley letter, San Bernardino, California to Hosea Stout, 1855 October 28,” Joseph Smith history documents, 1839-1860, CR 100 396, Church History Library, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, digital images at the Church History Catalog. See also Theodore’s 1855 Letter to Hosea Stout: A Testimony of Joseph Smith page.
  168. Utah, Salt Lake City Cemetery Records, 1847-1896, Record of the Dead Book B, p. 89, interment no. 2900, Alvin Turley, 29 May 1872, image 204 of digital film 7420258 at FamilySearch.org, digitized from FHL 1299167, https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QS7-L9CR-TTG6?i=203&cc=2094273&cat=23661, accessed March 2021.
  169. Caroline B. Crosby diary, 9 Dec. 1855. Lyman, Payne, Ellsworth, No Place to Call Home, 375.
  170. Caroline B. Crosby diary, 13 Jan. 1856. Lyman, Payne, Ellsworth, No Place to Call Home, 383.
  171. Caroline B. Crosby diary, 23 Mar. 1856. Lyman, Payne, Ellsworth, No Place to Call Home, 397.
  172. Caroline B. Crosby diary, 25 May. 1856. Lyman, Payne, Ellsworth, No Place to Call Home, 407.
  173. David Roche Turley II, Minersville and Beaver Field Trip timeline, citing Kate B. Carter’s Our Pioneer Heritage.
  174. “Remarks,” Deseret News, Wednesday, 8 Oct. 1856, p. 2, col. 3, Utah Digital Newspapers.
  175. “Jacob Bushman, Autobiography, Typescript, BYU, 1943” available at Ann Lewis’ family history blog.
  176. Caroline B. Crosby diary, 31 May 1857. Lyman, Payne, Ellsworth, No Place to Call Home, 469.
  177. Jacob Bushman recorded in 1902 that he left San Bernardino on 25 December in company his father-in-law, brothers-in-law, and about twenty other families. Joseph Soll Turley wrote in 1971, “Brigham Young ordered their return to Utah in mid-winter and Aunt Sara told me they spent Xmas day camped on summit in El Cajon Pass in the snow.” Letter from Joseph Soll Turley, 6653 Olcott St., Tujunga, CA 91042, grandson of Theodore Turley and Ruth Jane Giles, to the Theodore Turley Family Organization on 4 Aug. 1971, see 1971 Letter from Joseph Soll Turley to Descendants of Theodore Turley; “Jacob Bushman, Autobiography, Typescript, BYU, 1943” available at Ann Lewis’ family history blog.
  178. “Jacob Bushman, Autobiography, Typescript, BYU, 1943” available at Ann Lewis’ family history blog.
  179. “Jacob Bushman, Autobiography, Typescript, BYU, 1943” available at Ann Lewis’ family history blog.
  180. “Mass Meetings, The Deseret News , Wednesday, 10 Mar. 1858, p. 6, col. 2-3, Utah Digital Newspapers.
  181. “Jacob Bushman, Autobiography, Typescript, BYU, 1943” available at Ann Lewis’ family history blog.
  182. “Cedar City Ward Relief Society minute book, 1856-1875 and 1892,” LR 151 22, images 30-31, Church History Library, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, https://catalog.churchofjesuschrist.org/assets?id=d8e94c43-3953-48fc-a8d6-6237271f89c9&crate=0&index=29, accessed March 2021.
  183. “Cedar City Ward Relief Society minute book, 1856-1875 and 1892,” LR 151 22, image 32, Church History Library, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, https://catalog.churchofjesuschrist.org/assets?id=d8e94c43-3953-48fc-a8d6-6237271f89c9&crate=0&index=31, accessed March 2021.
  184. Deseret Iron Company Account Book, 1854-1867, p. 492, digital image at Fold3.com.
  185. Deseret Iron Company Account Book, 1854-1867, p. 493, digital image at Fold3.com.
  186. “Cedar City Ward Relief Society minute book, 1856-1875 and 1892,” LR 151 22, image 32, Church History Library, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, https://catalog.churchofjesuschrist.org/assets?id=d8e94c43-3953-48fc-a8d6-6237271f89c9&crate=0&index=31, accessed March 2021.
  187. Deseret Iron Company Account Book, 1854-1867, p. 496, digital image at Fold3.com.
  188. Deseret Iron Company Account Book, 1854-1867, p. 497 and 498, digital image at Fold3.com.
  189. Deseret Iron Company Account Book, 1854-1867, p. 498, digital image at Fold3.com.
  190. “Sat, 6th. The investigation continued till near Night. Bro. E. Snow & I Dined with Bro. Theodore Turleys.” Robert Glass Cleland and Juanita Brooks, eds., A Mormon Chronicle: The Diaries of John D. Lee, 1848-1876 Vol. 1 (San Marino, Calif.: The Huntington Library, 1955), 179, digitized at HathiTrust.org.
  191. Ruth’s sister, Mary Meek Giles, was baptized by Erastus Snow on 4 Sep. 1842 in Essex County, Massachusetts. Jennifer Mackley, “Fifth in a Series on Wilford Woodruff’s Wives: Mary Meek Giles (September 6, 1802-October 3, 1852),” WilfordWoodruff.info, http://www.wilfordwoodruff.info/2013/02/third-in-series-on-wilford-woodruffs.html, accessed March 2021.
  192. Deseret Iron Company Account Book, 1854-1867, p. 508, digital image at Fold3.com.
  193. Deseret Iron Company Account Book, 1854-1867, p. 510, digital image at Fold3.com.
  194. Deseret Iron Company Account Book, 1854-1867, p. 512, digital image at Fold3.com.
  195. Deseret Iron Company Account Book, 1854-1867, p. 516, digital image at Fold3.com.
  196. Deseret Iron Company Account Book, 1854-1867, p. 522, digital image at Fold3.com.
  197. This was the last mention I could find of Amelia Turley in the Cedar City Relief Society minutes. “Cedar City Ward Relief Society minute book, 1856-1875 and 1892,” LR 151 22, image 36, Church History Library, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, https://catalog.churchofjesuschrist.org/assets?id=d8e94c43-3953-48fc-a8d6-6237271f89c9&crate=0&index=35, accessed March 2021.
  198. A handwritten list of lots claimed and issued by the probate court in the early 1870s includes a note about Lots 7 and 18, both owned by Erastus Snow. “Original on 7 & 18 Theodore Turley 1858 to John D. Lee & Dec. 1861 to Erastus Snow.” Historic Washington, 1857-1982, image 40 of digital film 8939109 at FamilySearch.org, digitized from FHL 1654718.
  199. Theodore sold Lots 7 and 18 with the gristmill to John D. Lee in January 1860 (see timeline). In February 1861, John D. Lee sold Theodore’s small gristmill to Henry Barney who moved the structure to the nearby town of Grafton. Cleland and Brooks, A Mormon Chronicle, 300-301.
  200. “Sund., Feb. 20th. Clear & fine. At 11 mor[ning] I delivered a lecture to the Saints in this city upon the SubJect of obeidiance & humility in the gospel. Followed by Elder T. Turly.” Cleland and Brooks, A Mormon Chronicle, 196.
  201. “Semi-Annual Conference,” The Deseret News, Wednesday, 12 Oct. 1859, p. 1, col. 2, Utah Digital Newspapers.
  202. “Remarks,” The Deseret News, Wednesday, 21 Dec. 1859, p. 1, col. 1, Utah Digital Newspapers.
  203. Cleland and Brooks, A Mormon Chronicle, 226.
  204. “Minutes of a Conference,” The Deseret News, Wednesday, 8 Feb. 1860, p. 5, col. 4, Utah Digital Newspapers.
  205. Blacksmiths used coke as fuel for their forges. DeZengo, “The History of Blacksmithing,” Appalachian Ironworks, 29 Sept. 2013, http://www.appalachian-ironworks.com/history_blacksmith/, accessed March 2021; Deseret Iron Company Account Book, 1854-1867, p. 541, digital image at Fold3.com.
  206. Cleland and Brooks, A Mormon Chronicle, 231.
  207. Cleland and Brooks, A Mormon Chronicle, 231.
  208. “Stipulation of a contract Made & Entered into between Jno. D. Lee & Theodore Turley & co., both of Washington: 1st, the Said Jno. D. Lee binds himself to pay & deliver to the Party of the 2nd Part three second rates Milch cows in calf or with calves, also four 2 year old Steers [this] coming spring or about Nov.; also one 4 year old Mare coming spring; also 16 & 2/3 gallons of good Molases, all to be delivered at Harmony, w.c. on or before the 1st day of April next. For & in consideration of the above payment, the aforesaid Theodore Turly & co., of the 2nd Part, bind themselves to Pay & deliver unto the aforesaid Jno. D. Lee of the 1st part, Their Mill at washington as it now stands, togeather with all their rights, Title, claims & improvements thereunto appertaining, including their land claim & improvements, Shanties, corralls, bins, Pens, Lumber or Timbers &c.; 1 set of Blacksmith Tools, consisting of a large bellows, anvil, 4 Pair Tongs, 1 sledge & 2 hand hammer, 3 heading Tools, Pincher, shoeing hammer, 6 Punchs. & chisels, Tools for Making horse shoes, chisel & hammer for dressing Mill Stones, the extra belting that is about the Mill, the Smutter & apparatus therunto belonging, also the work bench, Turning lathe, adobies &c. The Mill to be delivered up in good repair about the 16th instant. Jno. D. Lee, Theodore Turley, Witnessed by Wm. Freem, wits.” Cleland and Brooks, A Mormon Chronicle, 231-232.
  209. Cleland and Brooks, A Mormon Chronicle, 237.
  210. Cleland and Brooks, A Mormon Chronicle, 237.
  211. Cleland and Brooks, A Mormon Chronicle, 243.
  212. David Roche Turley II, Minersville and Beaver Field Trip timeline, citing Beaver High Priest Meeting Minutes.
  213. Cleland and Brooks, A Mormon Chronicle, 253.
  214. 1860 U.S. census, Utah Territory, Beaver Co., Beaver, p. 135, dwelling 1141, family 1018, household of Theodore Turley, image on Ancestry.com.
  215. The Minersville School list of 20 April 1862 included “Theadore Lyman, Ira Lyman, Omner Turley, Alvin Turley,…Elizabeth Franklin.” Minersville Centennial Committee,They Answered the Call: A History of Minersville, Utah, 2nd ed. (Bountiful, Utah: Family History Publishers, 1997), 143.
  216. David Roche Turley II, Minersville and Beaver Field Trip timeline, citing Beaver High Priest Meeting Minutes.
  217. David Roche Turley II, Minersville and Beaver Field Trip timeline, citing Beaver High Priest Meeting Minutes.
  218. Amasa M. Lyman diary, 27 Jun. 1863.
  219. Transcript available here. Image of letter appears in the June 2012 Theodore Turley Family Newsletter
  220. David Roche Turley II, Minersville and Beaver Field Trip timeline, no citation.
  221. David Roche Turley II, Minersville and Beaver Field Trip timeline, citing Beaver High Priest Meeting Minutes.
  222. David Roche Turley II, Minersville and Beaver Field Trip timeline, citing Beaver High Priest Meeting Minutes.
  223. David Roche Turley II, Minersville and Beaver Field Trip timeline, citing Beaver High Priest Meeting Minutes.
  224. David Roche Turley II, Minersville and Beaver Field Trip timeline, citing Beaver High Priest Meeting Minutes.
  225. David Roche Turley II, Minersville and Beaver Field Trip timeline, citing Beaver High Priest Meeting Minutes.
  226. David Roche Turley II, Minersville and Beaver Field Trip timeline, citing Beaver High Priest Meeting Minutes.
  227. David Roche Turley II, Minersville and Beaver Field Trip timeline, citing Beaver High Priest Meeting Minutes.
  228. David Roche Turley II, Minersville and Beaver Field Trip timeline, citing Beaver High Priest Meeting Minutes.
  229. David Roche Turley II, Minersville and Beaver Field Trip timeline, citing Beaver High Priest Meeting Minutes.
  230. David Roche Turley II, Minersville and Beaver Field Trip timeline, citing Beaver High Priest Meeting Minutes.
  231. David Roche Turley II, Minersville and Beaver Field Trip timeline, citing Beaver High Priest Meeting Minutes.
  232. David Roche Turley II, Minersville and Beaver Field Trip timeline, citing Beaver High Priest Meeting Minutes.
  233. David Roche Turley II, Minersville and Beaver Field Trip timeline, citing Beaver High Priest Meeting Minutes.
  234. David Roche Turley II, Minersville and Beaver Field Trip timeline, citing Beaver High Priest Meeting Minutes.
  235. David Roche Turley II, Minersville and Beaver Field Trip timeline, citing Beaver High Priest Meeting Minutes.
  236. David Roche Turley II, Minersville and Beaver Field Trip timeline, citing Beaver High Priest Meeting Minutes.
  237. David Roche Turley II, Minersville and Beaver Field Trip timeline, citing Beaver High Priest Meeting Minutes.
  238. David Roche Turley II, Minersville and Beaver Field Trip timeline, citing Beaver High Priest Meeting Minutes.
  239. David Roche Turley II, Minersville and Beaver Field Trip timeline, citing Beaver High Priest Meeting Minutes.
  240. David Roche Turley II, Minersville and Beaver Field Trip timeline, citing Beaver High Priest Meeting Minutes.
  241. David Roche Turley II, Minersville and Beaver Field Trip timeline, citing Beaver High Priest Meeting Minutes.
  242. David Roche Turley II, Minersville and Beaver Field Trip timeline, citing Beaver High Priest Meeting Minutes.
  243. David Roche Turley II, Minersville and Beaver Field Trip timeline, citing Beaver High Priest Meeting Minutes.
  244. This may refer to the iron works in Cedar City, Utah. Amasa M. Lyman diary, 1 Mar. 1869.
  245. Amasa M. Lyman diary, 14-16 Mar. 1869.
  246. Amasa M. Lyman diary, 28 Jun. 1869.
  247. Amasa M. Lyman diary, 25 Aug. 1869.
  248. David Roche Turley II, Minersville and Beaver Field Trip timeline, citing Beaver High Priest Meeting Minutes.
  249. Amasa M. Lyman diary, 2 Jun. 1870.
  250. Amasa M. Lyman diary, 5 Jun. 1870.
  251. In the Tribune, the letter is dated 7 June 1870. Amasa M. Lyman’s diary states that he wrote the letter from Warren’s Ranch on 9 June 1870. Amasa M. Lyman diary, 9 Jun. 1870; “Correspondence from Elder A. M. Lyman,” Salt Lake Tribune, Saturday, June 18, 1870, p. 1, GenealogyBank.com, accessed 5 May 2019. For more information on the Godbeite movement (also called the Church of Zion or New Movement), see this short description at the Utah History Encyclopedia by Ronald Walker. A more in-depth treatment of the Godbeite movement is Ronald Walker’s Wayward Saints: The Godbeites and Brigham Young (Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1998).
  252. “Progress of the Movement in Beaver,” Salt Lake Tribune, Saturday, June 25, 1870, p. 3, GenealogyBank.com, accessed 5 May 2019. For more information on the Godbeite movement (also called the Church of Zion or New Movement), see this short description at the Utah History Encyclopedia by Ronald Walker. A more in-depth treatment of the Godbeite movement is Ronald Walker’s Wayward Saints: The Godbeites and Brigham Young (Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1998).
  253. “Local and Other Matters,” Deseret News, Thursday, June 23, 1870, p. 3, https://newspapers.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s67120pr/23156561, accessed 16 April 2020; “Local and Other Matters,” Deseret News, Wednesday, June 29, 1870, p. 1, https://newspapers.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s6tb22cx/2605900, accessed 16 April 2020.
  254. 1870 U.S. census, Utah Territory, Beaver Co., Beaver, p. 15, dwelling 122, family 109, household of Theodore Turley, image on Ancestry.com.
  255. Amasa M. Lyman diary, 7 Jan. 1871. In Thirteenth Apostle, editor Scott H. Partridge explained, “Roberts began advertising in 1870 for his ‘animal magnetism’ (hypnosis) saying he would only be available for thirty days, although he was still advertising years later. He claimed he could cure anything with mesmerism.”
  256. Amasa M. Lyman diary, 8 Jan. 1871.
  257. Amasa M. Lyman diary, 10 Jan. 1871.
  258. Amasa M. Lyman diary, 11 Jan. 1871.
  259. Amasa M. Lyman diary, 1 Feb. 1871.
  260. Amasa M. Lyman diary, 10 Feb. 1871.
  261. Amasa M. Lyman diary, 3 Mar. 1871.
  262. Besides the Godbeite movement, the Reorganized Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints (now Community of Christ) was attempting to gain support to build their own meeting house in Beaver. Theo Gurley letter to Louisa M. Lyman, Amasa M. Lyman collection, 1832-1877, MS 829, Church History Library, https://catalog.churchofjesuschrist.org/assets/5baddeee-f930-40af-b68f-d7075347d784/0/0, accessed July 2021.
  263. Amasa M. Lyman diary, 3 May 1871.
  264. Amasa M. Lyman diary, 5 Jun. 1871.
  265. Family records, likely based on a handwritten Family Memorial of Sarah Ellen Clift, state Theodore died on August 12, 1871. Amasa M. Lyman’s journal (entry of 22 August 1871) and Theodore’s 1872 probate record both give his date of death as 18 August 1871. Probate Records and Registers, 1856-June 1883,” Probate record of Theodore Turley, dated 30 July 1872, FHL 485230; Scott H. Partridge, ed., Thirteenth Apostle: The Diaries of Amasa M. Lyman, 1832-1877 (Salt Lake City: Signature Books, 2016), 666. Related blog post: “Do We have Theodore’s Death Date Wrong?”
  266. FindaGrave.com, memorial page for Theodore Turley (10 Apr 1801–12 Aug 1871), memorial no. 51057, citing Mountain View Cemetery, Beaver, Beaver County, Utah, United States.