Below is a timeline of Theodore Turley’s life according to the latest research by family members and others.1 This timeline will be updated as new data becomes available. Please contact us with any questions, corrections, or additions. (Last updated: 29 April 2020)

Early Life in England

1801
April 10: Theodore is born in Birmingham, England, to William Turley and Elizabeth Yates. He is their fourth child and first son.2
May 29: Theodore is christened at the church of St. Martin in the Bull Ring in Birmingham, England.3

1814
Theodore is apprenticed to Master James Parkes, a “Stamper, Piercer, and Toolmaker,” for seven years.4

1818
Theodore begins preaching Methodism as a lay minister.5

1821
November 26: Theodore Turley is married to Frances Amelia Kimberley at St. Peter’s Church in Harborne (southwest Birmingham).6

1822
September 4: A son is born to Theodore and Frances in Birmingham. They name him Theodore Turley, Jr.7
November 26: Theodore Turley, Jr., is christened at St. Philip’s Cathedral in Birmingham. Theodore, Sr., is noted as a “Stamper and Piercer” living on Lench Street.8

1823
Theodore Turley is listed with partner William Lindon in 1823 Wrightson’s Triennial Directory of Birmingham. “Turley and Lyndon, piercers and stampers, 24, Lench-street”9

1824
March 25: Theodore Turley and William Lindon dissolve their business partnership as “Stampers, Piercers, and Tool-makers.”10

1825
January 1: A daughter, Frances Amelia Turley, is born to Theodore and Frances in Birmingham.11
November 21: Theodore Turley and William Lindon give notice of their dissolved partnership.12

Theodore and his family move from Birmingham to London.

1826
August 24: Frances Amelia Turley is christened at St. George the Martyr church in south London. Theodore is noted as a “Toole Maker” living at nearby “Snowsfields.”13

Theodore and his family leave London and immigrate to York (now Toronto), Canada.14

Life in Canada

1827
April 19: Theodore Turley submits an advertisement to The Colonial Advocate, a newspaper based in York, Ontario, and the ad begins to run on April 26th. Theodore announces himself “Gunsmith, Bell-hanger, &c”and gives his address as “Kingstreet near Yonge-street, York.” He states that he is from London and announces that he is ready to receive orders. Services advertised are guns and pistols repaired; gun worms of all sorts; gun cleaning and other rods; swords made and repaired; screw drivers; letter and figure punches; bag, burn, and sheep marks; letters cut of all descriptions; fishing spears and rods; saws sharpened and repaired; saddlers punches & “creesers” of all descriptions; tinmen and braziers tools; boot and shoe makers tools; joiners and chair-makers “bitts”; locks made and repaired; all kinds of machinery made and repaired; all kinds of metal goods repaired on the shortest notice; smith work of every description made and repaired; old locks, keys, and metal bought.15
July 13: A daughter is born to Theodore and Frances in York. They name her Mary Ann Turley.16

1829
January 1: The Colonial Advocate begins to run a different advertisement for Theodore Turley. Theodore is listed as a patent beer and cider pump maker. He informs “the Tavern and Grocery keepers that he Manufactures all kinds of hand lifting or other pumps, at the N. York prices. N. B. All kinds of lamps and lanterns made to order. Tinmen’s patent tools, all kinds of white and Blacksmith work done on the shortest notice.”17
June 1: Another daughter, Priscilla Rebecca Turley, is born in York.18
September 24: Theodore submits a different type of advertisement to The Colonial Advocate, which begins to run in the October 8th edition. Theodore is identified as a smith and brass founder. It states, “BRASS CASTINGS for Mill work, &c. &c. done on the shortest notice. All kinds of White and Blacksmith’s work done to order. The highest prices, in CASH, will be paid for old brass, copper and tin.”19

Theodore and his family leave York and move to Churchville, Ontario.

1832
May 23: A son, Frederick Turley, is born in Churchville, Ontario.20

1834
June 20: Theodore and Frances purchase a seventy-five acre tract of land in Churchville from Erastus Wiman.21
July 5: A child, Obia Turley, is born to Theodore and Frances. The baby only lives a few weeks.22
July 29: Obia Turley is buried in Churchville, Ontario.23

1835
May 15: Theodore and Frances mortgage their seventy acres for fifty pounds to a local shopkeeper.24
September 24: A daughter is born to Theodore and Frances in Churchville. They name her Sarah Elizabeth Turley.25

1837
March 1: Theodore Turley and his wife, Frances, are baptized and become members of The Church of Jesus Christ. Missionary Isaac Russell most likely performed the baptism.26
March 2: Theodore is called on a mission to Canada. He later reports he “27
April 24: Parley P. Pratt ordains Theodore to the office of a priest at a church conference in Churchville.28
August 3: Theodore and Frances sell their seventy-five acre tract of land in Churchville for three-hundred-twenty-five pounds. Fellow Latter-day Saint William Law is one of the two witnesses to the property transfer.29
September: Theodore is called on a mission to Canada. He later reports he “Built up a Church . . . of 17 members in 3 wekes[;] among the Number was Elder Mulholand[,] Standing & Mulliner.”30
November 9: Theodore writes a letter to his friend, Isaac Russell, who is on a mission in England. Theodore reports on a recent trip to Kirtland, Ohio, where he had the opportunity to visit with Russell’s family. Theodore also mentions missionary efforts and the death of his son, Theodore Turley, Jr.31
November 12: A son is born to Theodore and Frances in Churchville. They name him Isaac, after their friend Isaac Russell who introduced them to The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.32

1838
Theodore and Frances travel with a group of fellow Latter-day Saints to settle in Far West, Missouri, led by Elder Almon W. Babbitt. Theodore later recalled that he, Frances, and their six children (Frances A., Mary Ann, Priscilla, Frederick, Sarah, and Isaac) made the journey with two wagons and four horses.33

Life in Far West, Missouri

1838
July 18: Theodore and his family arrive in Far West, Missouri.34
December 22: Theodore is ordained a seventy by Heber C. Kimball in Far West.35

1839

Settling Nauvoo, Illinois

1839

Mission to England

1839

1840
April 15: Back at home in Nauvoo, a daughter is born to Frances and Theodore. She is named Charlotte Turley.36

Life in Nauvoo, Illinois

1840

1841
February 6: Theodore Turley is brought before the Nauvoo High Council and charged with improper conduct while bringing the company of British Saints from England to Nauvoo. Theodore pled not guilty, but the charges were sustained. Theodore retained his fellowship after acknowledging publicly “that he had acted unwisely, unjustly, imprudently, and unbecoming, and that he had set a bad example before his brethren and sisters as he was coming over from Europe.”37
March: Theodore Turley and the members of his household are enumerated in Hancock County, Illinois, for the 1840 United States Federal Census.38
March 8: The Nauvoo City Council appoints Theodore Turley as city “Weigher and Sealer.”39

1842
January: Theodore Turley possibly enters into a plural marriage with Mary Clift.40
April 8: Theodore Turley initiated into first degree of Masonry at the Nauvoo Masonic Lodge.41
April 11: Theodore Turley becomes a second degree Mason (Fellow Craft) at the Nauvoo Masonic Lodge.42
April 19: Theodore Turley is raised to the degree of Master Mason at the Nauvoo Masonic Lodge.43
September 3-4: A case is brought before the Nauvoo High Council against Gustavus Hills, accused of having “illicit intercourse” with “a certain woman by the name of Mary Clift by which she is with child.” Hills is also accused of telling Mary Clift that church leaders did the same and “the time would come when men would have more wives than one &c.” Gustavus Hills is found guilty of the charges and disfellowshipped.44 Robert Clift, Mary’s father, later brings a paternity suit against Hills. Hills signs an agreement on September 15th to financially support Mary Clift and the child.45
September 13: A son is born to Theodore and Frances. They name him Johnathan Turley.46
October 20: Mary Clift‘s son, Jason, is born in Nauvoo.47

1843
February 25: Theodore Turley is sworn in as Nauvoo’s Weigher and Sealer.48
September 24: Theodore Turley is ordained a high priest by George Miller in Nauvoo.49
October 26: Mary Clift‘s one-year-old son, Jason, dies.50

1844
March 6: Eliza Georgianna Clift is sealed to Theodore Turley as a plural wife.51
April 26: Sarah Ellen Clift is sealed to Theodore Turley as a plural wife.52
June 8: Theodore Turley testifies to the Nauvoo City Council that William Law and Wilson Law brought him “Bogus” dies to fix for counterfeiting money. 53

1845
February 11: A son, Ephraim Turley, is born to Theodore Turley and Mary Clift.54
March 1: Theodore Turley joins the Council of Fifty.55
July 6: Theodore and Mary Clift‘s four-month-old son, Ephraim Turley, dies in Nauvoo.56
August 2: A daughter, Princette Turley, is born to Theodore Turley and Sarah Ellen Clift.57
November 16: Church leaders in Nauvoo learn that Theodore Turley was arrested in Alton, Illinois, on the charge of “bogus making.”58
December 13: Word is received in Nauvoo that “Lucian B. Adams, son of the late Judge Adams has effected a complete revolution in the minds of the inhabitants of Springfield, so much so that Judge Pope is convinced that E[lde]r [Theodore] Turley is imprisoned through persecution and says he shall discharge him the moment he arrives at Springfield.”59
December 17: Theodore Turley is indicted by a grand jury on charges of counterfeiting U.S. and Mexican coins. Eleven other Nauvoo citizens are indicted on the same charges the following day.60
December 18: Theodore Turley is released from custody on $250 bail and returns to Nauvoo. Two Springfield, Illinois, citizens serve as bondsmen for him: lawyer Lucian B. Adams and Latter-day Saint Nicholas Groesbeck, who’d previously served as bondsman to Joseph Smith.61
December 20: Theodore Turley and four of his family members (Frances Amelia Kimberley, Priscilla Turley, Frances Amelia Turley, and Mary Ann Turley) receive their endowments in the Nauvoo Temple.62 Theodore Turley is initiated into the Anointed Quroum.63

1846
January 16: Theodore’s daughter, Priscilla Rebecca Turley, is sealed as a plural wife to Amasa M. Lyman.64
January 19: Theodore Turley is sealed to both Frances Amelia Kimberley and Sarah Ellen Clift in the Nauvoo Temple.65
January 24: Theodore’s daughter, Frances Amelia Turley, is sealed to Cyrus Daniels in the Nauvoo Temple.66
February 3: Theodore Turley is sealed to both Eliza Clift and Mary Clift in the Nauvoo Temple.67 Theodore’s daughter, Mary Ann Turley, is sealed as a plural wife to Brigham Young on the same day. Theodore Turley serves as a witness to that sealing.68
May 12: Three-year-old Johnathan Turley, the youngest child of Theodore and Frances, dies at Garden Grove, Iowa.69
June 4: Back in Springfield, Illinois, the United States Circuit Court is back in session considering the counterfeiting indictments against Theodore Turley and other Nauvoo citizens. Because Theodore skipped bail, a writ of scire facias is brought against the two men designated as sureties of Theodore Turley’s $250 bond: Lucian B. Adams and Nicholas Groesbeck.70

Life in Winter Quarters, Nebraska

1846
September 2: Princette Turley, one-year-old daughter of Theodore Turley and Sarah Ellen Clift, dies from a fever.71
December 1: Theodore’s twenty-one-year-old daughter, Frances A. Daniels, dies after giving birth to a baby girl, Frances G. Daniels. The baby also passes away. They are buried in the same grave in the Winter Quarters cemetery.72
December 5: Twin boys, Joseph Smith Turley and Hyrum Smith Turley, are born to Theodore Turley and Sarah Ellen Clift at Winter Quarters.73

1847
March 5: Joseph Smith Turley, three-month-old twin son of Theodore Turley and Sarah Ellen Clift, dies of “water in the brain.”74
April 29: Hyrum Smith Turley, the remaining twin son of Theodore Turley and Sarah Ellen Clift, dies of “crupe” at the age of four months.75
May 4: Sarah Ellen Clift Turley, Theodore’s twenty-nine-year-old plural wife, dies of scurvy.76
August 30: Theodore’s forty-seven-year-old wife, Frances Amelia Kimberley Turley, also dies of scurvy in Winter Quarters. She is buried in the same grave as her daughter, Frances A. Daniels, and granddaughter, Frances G. Daniels.77
November 28: Theodore Turley becomes a member of the Winter Quarters high council.78

1848
May 28: A son is born to Theodore Turley and Mary Clift. They name him Theodoreus.79
August 27: Theodore writes a letter to President Brigham Young in Salt Lake City, Utah. He states that he and his family are on their way to the Salt Lake Valley and asks for some building materials to be set aside for them to build a small house there.80
December 31: Theodore and Mary Clift‘s seven-month-old son, Theodoreus Turley, dies at Winter Quarters.81

1849

Crossing the Plains

1849

Life in Salt Lake City, Utah

1849
Late October: Theodore Turley and his family enter the Salt Lake Valley with the Silas Richards Company.82 He later acquires property on the southwest corner of South Temple and 500 West.83

1850
March 22: A daughter, Frances Kimberley Turley, is born to Theodore Turley and Mary Clift.84
March 30: Theodore’s plural wife, Mary Clift Turley, dies from childbirth complications. She is buried in the Salt Lake City Cemetery.85
June 18: Theodore marries Ruth Jane Giles at the Deseret Mint in Salt Lake City, Utah.86
August 13: Theodore registers his cattle brand, a simple cross on the animal’s left hip.87
December 18: Theodore places a notice in the Deseret News advertising a lost heifer. The ad appears in December, January, and February issues of the newspaper.88

1851
January 15: Theodore’s daughter, Mary Ann, obtains an official divorce from Brigham Young. Although Mary Ann was sealed to Brigham Young five years earlier, there’s no evidence she ever lived in his household.89
February/March: Theodore’s property in Salt Lake City is transferred to Lyman Homiston, who emigrated to Utah in 1850.90
March/April: Theodore and his household members are enumerated in Utah County for the 1850 United States Federal Census.91

Settling San Bernardino, California

1851

1852
January 20: A son, Jacob Omner Turley, is born to Theodore Turley and Ruth Jane Giles in San Bernardino.

1853

1854

1855
May 15: A son, Alvin Hope Turley, is born to Theodore Turley and Ruth Jane Giles in San Bernardino.
June: Theodore Turley and another Englishman, Orrin Stoddard, are the recipients of the first naturalization papers issued in San Bernardino.92
October 28: Theodore writes a letter to Hosea Stout

1856
July 4: Theodore Turley speaks at a 4th of July celebration in San Bernardino.93

1857
March 4: Theodore’s daughter, Charlotte Turley, marries Jacob Bushman in San Bernardino.
December 25: According to an account by Theodore’s daughter, Sarah Elizabeth, the family spends Christmas Day in the Cajon Pass on their journey back to Utah.

Life in Southern Utah

1858
January/February: Theodore and his family arrive in Utah and initially settle in Cedar City, Utah.94
February 14: Theodore addresses a meeting for residents in and around Cedar City, Utah.95

Theodore Turley and his family move from Cedar City to Washington, Utah.

1858

1859

1860

Theodore Turley and his family move from Washington to Minersville, Utah.

1860
February: Theodore and his family settle in Minersville, Utah.
April 18: Theodore Turley is listed in the Beaver High Priest Quorum meeting minutes.96

1861

1862
September 4: Theodore Turley gives the opening prayer in a meeting of the Beaver High Priests. President Brigham Young then addresses the quorum.97

1863
March 8: The Beaver High Priest meeting minutes note, “Bro. Rollins and Turley of Minersville spoke…”98

1864
July 12: Theodore Turley writes a letter to his children in California. The letter is addressed from Minersville.99

Theodore Turley and his family move from Minersville to Beaver, Utah.

1865
November 12: Theodore Turley moves to Beaver, Utah.100
November 25: Theodore Turley officially received into the Beaver High Priest Quorum.101

1866
January 7: Theodore Turley bears testimony at Beaver High Priests quorum meeting.102
February 4: Theodore Turley speaks at Beaver High Priests meeting.103
June 25: Theodore Turley testifies of God at Beaver High Priests meeting.104
August 30: Theodore Turley prays in Beaver High Priests meeting and speaks about storing grain.105
October 14: Theodore Turley present at Beaver High Priests meeting.106
November 15: Theodore Turley present at Beaver High Priests meeting. He comments on evil practices in their midst.107
November 29: Theodore Turley present at Beaver High Priests meeting. He comments on adultery punishment.108
December 23: Theodore Turley present at Beaver High Priests meeting. He comments on the Word of Wisdom.109

1867
January: Theodore Turley listed as a member of the Beaver High Priests Quorum.110
January 20: Theodore Turley present at Beaver High Priests meeting. He speaks on the prosperity of the Church.111
February 3: Theodore Turley present at Beaver High Priests meeting. He speaks on the sentiments of the Lord.112
March 17: Theodore Turley present at Beaver High Priests meeting. He speaks on detecting good versus evil spirits.113
April 11: Theodore Turley present at Beaver High Priests meeting and gives the closing prayer.114
April 28: Theodore Turley present at Beaver High Priests meeting and comments on having the quorum settle its own problems.115
May 6: Theodore Turley present at Beaver High Priests meeting where the change of quorum leadership directed by Brigham Young is discussed.116

1868
February 2: Theodore Turley present at Beaver High Priests meeting.117
March 1: Theodore Turley present at Beaver High Priests meeting.118
March 29: Theodore Turley present at Beaver High Priests meeting.119
April 26: Theodore Turley present at Beaver High Priests meeting.120
June 22: Theodore Turley present at Beaver High Priests meeting.121
August 17: Theodore Turley present at Beaver High Priests meeting.122
September 13: Theodore Turley present at Beaver High Priests meeting.123

1869

1870
April 15: Beaver High Priest Quorum members are listed in meeting minutes. Theodore Turley’s name is crossed out.124
June 7: Amasa M. Lyman writes a letter to “Brothers Harrison and Godbe.” He mentions preaching in both Minersville and Beaver. “There will be meetings held here in favor of the Church of Zion, for the present under the supervision of Theodore Turley.” The letter is published in the June 18th edition of the Salt Lake Tribune.125
June 12: Theodore Turley is excommunicated or “cut off” from The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in Beaver. Robert Kershaw of Beaver writes a letter the same day to “Bros. Harrison and Godbe” announcing Theodore’s excommunication and offering commentary: “Among those that have been cut off to-day is Theodore Turley,—a man that stands somewhat conspicuous im [sic] the history of this Church, and a member of between thirty and forty years standing. He is a man who was intimately acquainted with Joseph Smith in his life time, and one whose confidence has never been shaken in our founder.” Theodore is named a member of the new Church of Zion.126
June 14: William Fotheringham sends notice to the Deseret News of the excommunication of several Beaver citizens for apostasy. Theodore Turley’s name is among them. The notice is published in the June 23rd and June 29th editions of the Deseret News.127

1871
August 18: Theodore Turley dies of mouth cancer.128 He is later buried at Mountain View Cemetery in Beaver, Utah.129

  1. Created by Mary Ann Clements 16 April 2020. This timeline builds on previous compilations by family members Ann Laemmlen Lewis, David Roche Turley II (September 2016 Beaver/Minersville TTFO Field Trip), and Ferron L. Andersen (published in the October 2001 Theodore Turley Family Newsletter).
  2. There is some confusion as to whether Theodore Turley was born in 1800 or 1801. Theodore himself states a birth year of 1800 in his personal life sketch written c. 1840, in the 1 February 1840 entry in his mission journal, and on one of his handwritten family memorials. However, Theodore also stated an 1801 birth year in another handwritten family memorial. The 1801 date is also in his Nauvoo endowment record and Nauvoo Temple sealing record. The family has typically gone with the 1801 birth year due to his christening in May 1801 as well as his stated ages on U.S. Federal censuses in 1850 (taken in 1851), 1860, and 1870. Devery S. Anderson and Gary James Bergara, The Nauvoo Endowment Companies, 1845-1846: A Documentary History (Salt Lake City, Utah: Signature Books, 2005), p. 109; Nauvoo and sealing record “A”, 1846-1857, p. 523-524 and p.773-774, entries for Theodore Turley, FHL 183374.
  3. Birmingham, England, Church of England Baptisms, Marriages and Burials, 1538-1812, baptism of Theodore Turley, 29 May 1801, Ancestry.com.
  4. In the 7 February 1840 entry of his 1840 mission journal, Theodore wrote that he visited his “old Master James Parkes.” Theodore’s grandson, Joseph Soll Turley, wrote in 1971 that he personally saw Theodore’s 1814 indenture record to “Samuel Parks, Stamper, Piercer, and Toolmaker.” If the name was abbreviated, it’s possible Joseph Soll Turley mistook Jams for Saml. James Parkes is listed as a “stamper and piercer” in the 1818 edition of Wrightson’s Triennial Directory of Birmingham, available on Ancestry.com. Records indicate that James Parkes began his company in 1815, shortly after Theodore was apprenticed. His company was later known for manufacturing microscopes and other scientific equipment.
  5. Life sketch written by Theodore Turley c. 1840.
  6. Family Memorial; Birmingham, England, Church of England Marriages and Banns, 1754-1937, marriage of Theodore Turley (indexed as Theodore Sailey) and Frances Kimberley, 26 November 1821, Ancestry.com.
  7. Family Memorial – Frances Amelia Kimberley; Birmingham, England, Church of England Baptisms, 1813-1912, baptism record of Theodore Turley, 26 November 1822, Ancestry.com.
  8. Family Memorial; Birmingham, England, Church of England Baptisms, 1813-1912, baptism record of Theodore Turley, 26 November 1822, Ancestry.com.
  9. Page 142 of 1823 Wrightson’s Triennial Directory of Birmingham. UK, Midlands and Various UK Trade Directories, 1770-1941, Ancestry.com.
  10. The London Gazette, 26 November 1825, Issue 18197, p. 2176, The Gazette public records website; Aris’s Birmingham Gazette, Monday, 28 November 1825, p. 2, col. 5, accessed 15 April 2020, The British Newspaper Archive.
  11. There is some confusion on the year of birth for Frances A. Turley. The Family Memorial and her Nauvoo Temple sealing record both state that Frances was born on 1 January 1824. However, her 1826 christening record, Nauvoo endowment record, and Winter Quarters death record all indicate she was born on 1 January 1825. London, England, Church of England Births and Baptisms, 1813-1917, baptism record of Frances Amelia Thurley [sic], 24 August 1826, Ancestry.com; Devery S. Anderson and Gary James Bergara, The Nauvoo Endowment Companies, 1845-1846: A Documentary History (Salt Lake City, Utah: Signature Books, 2005), p. 109; Nauvoo and sealing record “A”, 1846-1857, p. 245-246, entry for Frances Amelia Turley, FHL 183374; Winter Quarters sexton’s records, 1846-1848; Record book; Church History Library, https://catalog.churchofjesuschrist.org/assets?id=1647eb3e-6020-4669-91a2-603820678def&crate=0&index=13 (accessed: April 15, 2020).
  12. The London Gazette, 26 November 1825, Issue 18197, p. 2176, The Gazette public records website; Aris’s Birmingham Gazette, Monday, 28 November 1825, p. 2, col. 5, accessed 15 April 2020, The British Newspaper Archive.
  13. The Family Memorial states that Frances was registered at “St. Gorge’s Church Birminsey London.” Bermondsey is a district in Southwark, the same south London borough where St. George the Martyr church is located. London, England, Church of England Births and Baptisms, 1813-1917, baptism record of Frances Amelia Thurley [sic], 24 August 1826, Ancestry.com.
  14. Theodore notes in his life sketch (written c. 1840) that he immigrated to Canada in 1825. Given the August 1826 christening date of his daughter in London, he must’ve been off a year or two.
  15. The Colonial Advocate, Thursday, April 26, 1827, p. 2, col. 1, accessed 29 April 2020, Google News Archive, https://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=DQNrXyjhriIC&dat=18270426&printsec=frontpage&hl=en; Ann Laemmlen Lewis Timeline.
  16. Family Memorial, Theodore notes in that memorial that Mary Ann’s birth was registered with the Methodist Episcopal Church in York, Upper Canada (now Toronto), but we have not yet located that record; Devery S. Anderson and Gary James Bergara, The Nauvoo Endowment Companies, 1845-1846: A Documentary History (Salt Lake City, Utah: Signature Books, 2005), p. 109; Nauvoo and sealing record “A”, 1846-1857, p. 577-578, entry for Mary Ann Turley, FHL 183374.
  17. Ann Laemmlen Lewis Timeline. An image of an anvil is later added to the advertisement. For an example of this later advertisement and a link to online images of the newspaper, see Canadian Newspapers.
  18. Family Memorial; Devery S. Anderson and Gary James Bergara, The Nauvoo Endowment Companies, 1845-1846: A Documentary History (Salt Lake City, Utah: Signature Books, 2005), p. 109; Nauvoo and sealing record “A”, 1846-1857, p. 379-380, entry for Priscilla Rebecca Turley, FHL 183374.
  19. Ann Laemmlen Lewis Timeline. For an example of this advertisement and a link to online images of the newspaper, see Canadian Newspapers.
  20. Family Memorial. Frederick appears to be named after Theodore’s little brother, Frederick, who died in England just two years earlier, in July 1830. He was only seventeen years old. For more information, see the Theodore Turley: A Biography newsletter installment by Richard E. Turley, Jr., “2: The Pre-Conversion Canadian Years.”
  21. See Richard E. Turley, “2: The Pre-Conversion Canadian Years,” Theodore Turley: A Biography newsletter series, citing Toronto Township Deeds No. 11149.
  22. It is unclear is Obia was a boy or a girl. Family Memorial.
  23. Family Memorial.
  24. Richard E. Turley, “2: The Pre-Conversion Canadian Years,” Theodore Turley: A Biography newsletter series.
  25. Family Memorial.
  26. Although Theodore seems to suggest Parley P. Pratt baptized them in his personal life sketch written c. 1840, that is impossible; Pratt was in Kirtland, Ohio, on March 1st. See Richard E. Turley, Jr., “3: Joining the Latter-day Saints,” Theodore Turley: A Biography newsletter series.
  27. Theodore’s personal life sketch written c. 1840.
  28. Historical Department journal history of the Church, 1830-2008; 1830-1839; 1837; Church History Library, accessed 27 April 2020, https://catalog.churchofjesuschrist.org/assets?id=d87cf687-399a-497c-889c-af5de8ea18ca&crate=0&index=51. See also Richard E. Turley, Jr., “4: Church Life in Canada, 1837-1838,” Theodore Turley: A Biography newsletter series.
  29. Toronto Township Deeds No. 14467.
  30. Transcription by Richard E. Turley, Jr., in “4: Church Life in Canada, 1837-1838,” Theodore Turley: A Biography newsletter series. See also Theodore’s personal history written circa 1840. Samuel Mulliner was baptized 10 September 1837 (FamilySearch ID KWJY-JSG). James Standing was baptized 24 September 1837 (FamilySearch ID KWV3-VYZ).
  31. View transcript of letter here. Russell, Isaac 1807-1844. Isaac Russell correspondence, accessed 15 April 2020, https://catalog.churchofjesuschrist.org/assets?id=8e24060e-2e53-46bf-8eb1-a3c6f5fd8949&crate=0&index=20. See also Richard E. Turley, Jr., “4: Church Life in Canada, 1837-1838,” Theodore Turley: A Biography newsletter series.
  32. Family Memorial; Richard E. Turley, Jr., “4: Church Life in Canada, 1837-1838,” Theodore Turley: A Biography newsletter series.
  33. Richard E. Turley, Jr., “5: Gathering with the Saints, 1838,” Theodore Turley: A Biography newsletter series, citing Theodore’s missionary diary.
  34. Theodore recorded July 18th as the date of their arrival in his missionary diary. Joseph Smith’s journal records the arrival of Elder Almon W. Babbitt’s company on Saturday, July 28th. Richard E. Turley, Jr., “5: Gathering with the Saints, 1838,” Theodore Turley: A Biography newsletter series.
  35. Biography at the Joseph Smith Papers website, citing Nauvoo Seventies List. Compiled by Nauvoo Restoration. 3 vols. [Salt Lake City]: By the author, n.d.
  36. Family Memorial.
  37. The four charges were as follows (edits from the published transcript by John S. Dinger): (1) “For unchristian conduct while on the sea [and] for romping and kising the females and dancing”; (2) “For sleeping with two females coming up the Lakes and on the road to Dixons ferry”; (3) “For not settling with the brethren for what money he received of them, and taking the lumber from the boat without leave”; and (4) “For threatening the brethren that Brother Joseph [Smith] would not hear any thing that they would not tell him about[,] for he was of the same spirit and signified the same Priesthood[,] signifying if they told him he would not hear [believe] them.” John S. Dinger, ed., The Nauvoo City and High Council Minutes (Salt Lake City: Signature Books, 2011), p. 388-389.
  38. “United States Census, 1840,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:XHB8-X61 : 15 August 2017), Thedr Turley, Hancock, Illinois, United States, accessed 8 April 2020; Stanley B. Kimball, Sources of Mormon History in Illinois, 1839-48: An Annotated Catalog of the Microfilm Collection at Southern Illinois University, 2nd ed. (Carbondale, Ill.: Central Publications, 1966), 19, accessed 8 April 2020, http://www.siue.edu/lovejoy-library/tas/Kimball_Sources.pdf. Related blog post: “Celebrating the U.S. Census with Theodore Turley’s Census Records.”
  39. John S. Dinger, ed., The Nauvoo City and High Council Minutes (Salt Lake City: Signature Books, 2011), p. 20.
  40. The family has traditionally dated Theodore’s marriage as “prior to 1842” (The Theodore Turley Family Book) or January 1842. This places the marriage comfortably before the birth of Mary Clift‘s son, Jason, in October of that year. Theodore records the son as “Jason Turley” in the Family Memorial for Mary Clift. Historians such as Gary James Bergara and George D. Smith point out, however, that a case brought before the Nauvoo High Council in September 1842 confirms Jason was the illegitimate child of Mary Clift and Gustavus Hills. Gustavus Hills even agreed to support Mary Clift and the child financially in a paternity suit afterwards. Some family researchers assert that the early plural marriage between Theodore Turley and Mary Clift is still likely, and that the high council case could have been an elaborate scheme to hide the early practice of plural marriage in Nauvoo. For one argument that Theodore Turley may have been exposed to the idea of plural marriage as early as 1839, see the chapter “Polygamy” in Theodore Turley: A Biography by Richard E. Turley, Jr. For accounts arguing that family members “antedated” the marriage to make Mary Clift‘s child look legitimate, see Gary James Bergara, “‘Illicit Intercourse,’ Plural Marriage, and the Nauvoo Stake High Council, 1840-1844,” John Whitmer Historical Association Journal 23 (2003): 75-77; George D. Smith, Nauvoo Polygamy: “…But We Called It Celestial Marriage” 2nd ed. (Salt Lake City: Signature Books, 2011), Kindle location 6846-6865.
  41. Freemasons; Nauvoo Lodge (Ill.). Freemasons minutebook , https://catalog.churchofjesuschrist.org/assets?id=dafc2c46-c417-41d2-a25f-fceb98ca2f09&crate=0&index=37 (accessed: April 15, 2020)
  42. Freemasons; Nauvoo Lodge (Ill.). Freemasons minutebook , https://catalog.churchofjesuschrist.org/assets?id=dafc2c46-c417-41d2-a25f-fceb98ca2f09&crate=0&index=38 (accessed: April 15, 2020)
  43. Freemasons; Nauvoo Lodge (Ill.). Freemasons minutebook , https://catalog.churchofjesuschrist.org/assets?id=dafc2c46-c417-41d2-a25f-fceb98ca2f09&crate=0&index=43 (accessed: April 15, 2020).
  44. John S. Dinger, ed., The Nauvoo City and High Council Minutes (Salt Lake City: Signature Books, 2011), p. 424-426; Gary James Bergara, “‘Illicit Intercourse,’ Plural Marriage, and the Nauvoo Stake High Council, 1840-1844,” John Whitmer Historical Association Journal 23 (2003): 75-77.
  45. Gary James Bergara, “‘Illicit Intercourse,’ Plural Marriage, and the Nauvoo Stake High Council, 1840-1844,” John Whitmer Historical Association Journal 23 (2003): 76-77. A transcript of the agreement is available online here.
  46. Family Memorial.
  47. Theodore Turley records his name as “Jason Turley” on his later Family Memorial (Mary Clift).
  48. John S. Dinger, ed., The Nauvoo City and High Council Minutes (Salt Lake City: Signature Books, 2011), p. 163.
  49. Biography at the Joseph Smith Papers website, citing Leonard, Glen M. Nauvoo: A Place of Peace, a People of Promise. Salt Lake City: Deseret Book; Provo, UT: Brigham Young University Press, 2002.
  50. Family Memorial (Mary Clift).
  51. Traditional family information (The Theodore Turley Family Book). Do we have a source?
  52. Family Memorial (Sarah Ellen Clift).
  53. John S. Dinger, ed., The Nauvoo City and High Council Minutes (Salt Lake City: Signature Books, 2011), p. 240.
  54. Family Memorial (Mary Clift).
  55. Biography at the Joseph Smith Papers website, citing Council of Fifty. “Record of the Council of Fifty or Kingdom of God,” Mar. 1844–Jan. 1846. CHL.
  56. Family Memorial (Mary Clift).
  57. Family Memorial (Sarah Ellen Clift); Winter Quarters sexton’s records, 1846-1848; Record book; Church History Library, https://catalog.churchofjesuschrist.org/assets?id=1647eb3e-6020-4669-91a2-603820678def&crate=0&index=39 (accessed: April 15, 2020).
  58. Historical Department journal history of the Church, 1830-2008; 1840-1849; 1845; Church History Library, accessed 27 April 2020, https://catalog.churchofjesuschrist.org/assets?id=2987565f-96fb-470c-88c0-08c3ec43e3fe&crate=0&index=460.
  59. Devery S. Anderson and Gary James Bergara, The Nauvoo Endowment Companies, 1845-1846: A Documentary History (Salt Lake City, Utah: Signature Books, 2005), p. 25-26. Lucian was the son of Judge James Adams (1783-1843), a Mormon convert and a good friend to Joseph Smith. For more information on Adams, see Susan Easton Black, “James Adams of Springfield, Illinois: The Link between Abraham Lincoln and Joseph Smith,” Mormon Historical Studies (Spring 2009), vol. 10, no. 1, p. 33-49.
  60. Later records put Theodore’s indictment on the same day as the others (December 18th). “Record Group 206 Records of the Solicitor of the Treasury: Records relating to the indictment in Illinois of Brigham Young and Other Apostles of the Mormon Church on Charges of Counterfeiting, 1845-1848,” Photocopies available on Archive.org, accessed 27 April 2020, https://archive.org/details/RecordGroup206AndRecordGroup46/page/n115/mode/2up.
  61. “[A]t 6 o’clock a report came to Pres[ident]. Young that Theodore Turley had arrived in town, being liberated on bail of 250 dollars for his appearance at court next term; provided a bill of indictment should be found. report brought by Henry W. Miller.” Devery S. Anderson and Gary James Bergara, The Nauvoo Endowment Companies, 1845-1846: A Documentary History (Salt Lake City, Utah: Signature Books, 2005), p. 79-80. Lucian B. Adams and Nicholas Groesbeck are both listed as sureties in the U.S. District Attorney reports when the judgment is brought against them in the June 1846 term. “Record Group 206 Records of the Solicitor of the Treasury: Records relating to the indictment in Illinois of Brigham Young and Other Apostles of the Mormon Church on Charges of Counterfeiting, 1845-1848,” Photocopies available on Archive.org, accessed 27 April 2020, https://archive.org/details/RecordGroup206AndRecordGroup46/page/n121/mode/1up. Groesbeck is recorded as a bondsman for Joseph Smith in a family history account. Nicholas Groesbeck Morgan, Sr., Nicholas Groesbeck, September 5, 1819, June 29, 1884, published privately by the Groesbeck family, p. 6, digital reproduction available at Archive.org, accessed 27 April 2020, https://archive.org/details/nicholasgroesbec00morg/page/n19/mode/2up.
  62. Devery S. Anderson and Gary James Bergara, The Nauvoo Endowment Companies, 1845-1846: A Documentary History (Salt Lake City, Utah: Signature Books, 2005), p. 109.
  63. Gary James Bergara, “Identifying the Earliest Mormon Polygamists, 1841-44,” Dialogue: A Journal of Mormon Thought, Vol. 38 No. 3 (Fall 2005), p. 49.
  64. Nauvoo and sealing record “A”, 1846-1857, p. 379-380, entries for Amasa M. Lyman and Priscilla Rebecca Turley, FHL 183374.
  65. Family Memorial (Sarah Ellen Clift); Nauvoo and sealing record “A”, 1846-1857, p. 523-524, entries for Theodore Turley, Frances Kimberley, and Sarah Ellen Clift, FHL 183374.
  66. Nauvoo and sealing record “A”, 1846-1857, p. 245-246, entries for Cyrus Daniels and Frances Amelia Turley, FHL 183374.
  67. Family Memorial (Mary Clift); Nauvoo and sealing record “A”, 1846-1857, p. 523-524, entries for Theodore Turley, Eliza Clift, and Mary Clift, FHL 183374.
  68. Nauvoo and sealing record “A”, 1846-1857, p. 577-578, entry for Brigham Young and Mary Ann Turley, FHL 183374.
  69. Family Memorial.
  70. “Record Group 206 Records of the Solicitor of the Treasury: Records relating to the indictment in Illinois of Brigham Young and Other Apostles of the Mormon Church on Charges of Counterfeiting, 1845-1848,” Photocopies available on Archive.org, accessed 27 April 2020, https://archive.org/details/RecordGroup206AndRecordGroup46/page/n121/mode/1up.
  71. Family Memorial (Sarah Ellen Clift); Winter Quarters sexton’s records, 1846-1848; Record book; Church History Library, https://catalog.churchofjesuschrist.org/assets?id=1647eb3e-6020-4669-91a2-603820678def&crate=0&index=39 (accessed: April 15, 2020)
  72. Family Memorial; Winter Quarters sexton’s records, 1846-1848; Record book; Church History Library, https://catalog.churchofjesuschrist.org/assets?id=1647eb3e-6020-4669-91a2-603820678def&crate=0&index=13 (accessed: April 15, 2020).
  73. Family memorial (Sarah Ellen Clift); Winter Quarters sexton’s records, 1846-1848; Record book; Church History Library, https://catalog.churchofjesuschrist.org/assets?id=1647eb3e-6020-4669-91a2-603820678def&crate=0&index=22 for Joseph Smith Turley and https://catalog.churchofjesuschrist.org/assets?id=1647eb3e-6020-4669-91a2-603820678def&crate=0&index=28 for Hyrum Smith Turley (accessed: April 15, 2020).
  74. Family Memorial (Sarah Ellen Clift); Winter Quarters sexton’s records, 1846-1848; Record book; Church History Library, https://catalog.churchofjesuschrist.org/assets?id=1647eb3e-6020-4669-91a2-603820678def&crate=0&index=22 (accessed: April 15, 2020).
  75. Family Memorial (Sarah Ellen Clift); Winter Quarters sexton’s records, 1846-1848; Record book; Church History Library, https://catalog.churchofjesuschrist.org/assets?id=1647eb3e-6020-4669-91a2-603820678def&crate=0&index=28 (accessed: April 15, 2020).
  76. Family Memorial (Sarah Ellen Clift); Winter Quarters sexton’s records, 1846-1848; Record book; Church History Library, https://catalog.churchofjesuschrist.org/assets?id=1647eb3e-6020-4669-91a2-603820678def&crate=0&index=28 (accessed: April 15, 2020).
  77. Family Memorial; Winter Quarters sexton’s records, 1846-1848; Record book; Church History Library, https://catalog.churchofjesuschrist.org/assets?id=1647eb3e-6020-4669-91a2-603820678def&crate=0&index=38 (accessed: April 15, 2020).
  78. History of the Church, vol. 7, p. 620, accessed online 28 April 2020, https://byustudies.byu.edu/content/volume-7-chapter-41.
  79. Family Memorial (Mary Clift).
  80. View transcript here. Brigham Young office files, 1832-1878 (bulk 1844-1877); General Correspondence, Incoming, 1840-1877; General Letters, 1840- 1877; S-Y, 1848; Theodore Turley letter; Church History Library, https://catalog.churchofjesuschrist.org/assets?id=e7243170-5bae-49ce-ae88-549a83702a95&crate=0&index=0 (accessed: April 15, 2020).
  81. Family Memorial (Mary Clift).
  82. According to the Pioneer Overland Travel Website, the Silas Richards Company departed Council Bluffs, Iowa, on 10 July 1849 and arrived in the Salt Lake Valley 25-29 October 1849. See https://history.lds.org/overlandtravel/companies/5/silas-richards-company-1849.
  83. Related blog post: “In the Valley of the Great Salt Lake.”
  84. Family Memorial (Mary Clift). Related blog post: “In the Valley of the Great Salt Lake.”
  85. Family Memorial (Mary Clift). Related blog post: “In the Valley of the Great Salt Lake.”
  86. Nauvoo and sealing record “A”, 1846-1857, p. 773-774, sealing and marriage entry for Theodore Turley and Ruth Jane Giles, FHL 183374. Related blog post: “In the Valley of the Great Salt Lake.”
  87. Source citation: “Utah State Archives Indexes,” database and images, Utah State Archives (https://archives.utah.gov/research/indexes: accessed April 15, 2020), Department of Agriculture and Food. Division of Animal Industry Brand books, Series 540. Related blog post: “In the Valley of the Great Salt Lake.”
  88. Deseret News [Salt Lake City, UT], 28 Dec. 1850, 6. Digitized by J. Willard Marriott Library, University of Utah: https://newspapers.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s69g6g6w/2569129 (accessed April 15, 2020). Related blog post: “In the Valley of the Great Salt Lake.”
  89. Although Mary Ann was sealed as a plural wife to Brigham Young on 3 Feb 1846 in Nauvoo, there is no evidence she ever lived in his household. A divorce was granted 15 January 1851, prior to the Turley family’s move to San Bernardino. (Jeffrey Ogden Johnson, “Determining and Defining ‘Wife’: The Brigham Young Households.” Dialogue: A Journal of Mormon Thought 20, no. 3 (Fall 1987): p. 63 and p. 68 Footnote 38) A story related years later by Mary Ann’s sister, Sarah, to Joseph Soll Turley suggests Mary Ann was not happy in the relationship (1971 letter from Joseph Soll Turley). In contrast, Mary Ann’s younger sister, Priscilla, who also became a plural wife in Nauvoo, eventually moved into her husband Amasa Mason Lyman’s household and migrated west in 1848 with his family rather than Theodore’s.
  90. Theodore’s notices about the lost heifer are published through February, suggesting he didn’t move till after that point. Lyman Homiston/Harmiston (1778-1859) was in the Edward Hunter Company, which arrived in the valley on 13 October 1850. See the Pioneer Overland Travel Website for more information on Lyman Homiston or the Edward Hunter Company: https://history.churchofjesuschrist.org/overlandtravel/pioneers/5572/lyman-harmiston.
  91. “United States Census, 1850,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MCSX-WVM : 4 April 2020), Household of Theodore Turley, Utah county, Utah, Utah Territory, United States, accessed 8 April 2020; “The Seventh Census of the United States: Utah and Slavery,” Utah Historical Quarterly Web Extra (Spring 2017), accessed 8 April 2020, https://history.utah.gov/repository-item/the-seventh-census-of-the-united-states-utah-and-slavery-spring-2017/. Related blog posts: “In the Valley of the Great Salt Lake” and “Celebrating the U.S. Census with Theodore Turley’s Census Records.”
  92. “Fifty to Seek Citizenship at Hearing Oct. 7th.” The San Bernardino County Sun [San Bernardino, CA], 13 Sept. 1931, p. 7. Related blog post: “Theodore Turley Gains U.S. Citizenship.”
  93. David Roche Turley II, Minersville and Beaver Field Trip timeline, citing Kate B. Carter’s Our Pioneer Heritage.
  94. Theodore and his son, Isaac, appear in the account books for the Deseret Iron Company, based in Cedar City. Theodore’s daughter-in-law, Amelia Louisa Counsell Turley (Frederick’s wife), also appears in the Cedar City Relief Society minutes.
  95. Deseret News [Salt Lake City, UT], 10 Mar. 1858, 6. Digitized by J. Willard Marriott Library, University of Utah: https://newspapers.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s65726fj/2582711.
  96. David Roche Turley II, Minersville and Beaver Field Trip timeline, citing Beaver High Priest Meeting Minutes.
  97. David Roche Turley II, Minersville and Beaver Field Trip timeline, citing Beaver High Priest Meeting Minutes.
  98. David Roche Turley II, Minersville and Beaver Field Trip timeline, citing Beaver High Priest Meeting Minutes.
  99. Transcript available here. Image of letter appears in the June 2012 Theodore Turley Family Newsletter
  100. David Roche Turley II, Minersville and Beaver Field Trip timeline, no citation.
  101. David Roche Turley II, Minersville and Beaver Field Trip timeline, citing Beaver High Priest Meeting Minutes.
  102. David Roche Turley II, Minersville and Beaver Field Trip timeline, citing Beaver High Priest Meeting Minutes.
  103. David Roche Turley II, Minersville and Beaver Field Trip timeline, citing Beaver High Priest Meeting Minutes.
  104. David Roche Turley II, Minersville and Beaver Field Trip timeline, citing Beaver High Priest Meeting Minutes.
  105. David Roche Turley II, Minersville and Beaver Field Trip timeline, citing Beaver High Priest Meeting Minutes.
  106. David Roche Turley II, Minersville and Beaver Field Trip timeline, citing Beaver High Priest Meeting Minutes.
  107. David Roche Turley II, Minersville and Beaver Field Trip timeline, citing Beaver High Priest Meeting Minutes.
  108. David Roche Turley II, Minersville and Beaver Field Trip timeline, citing Beaver High Priest Meeting Minutes.
  109. David Roche Turley II, Minersville and Beaver Field Trip timeline, citing Beaver High Priest Meeting Minutes.
  110. David Roche Turley II, Minersville and Beaver Field Trip timeline, citing Beaver High Priest Meeting Minutes.
  111. David Roche Turley II, Minersville and Beaver Field Trip timeline, citing Beaver High Priest Meeting Minutes.
  112. David Roche Turley II, Minersville and Beaver Field Trip timeline, citing Beaver High Priest Meeting Minutes.
  113. David Roche Turley II, Minersville and Beaver Field Trip timeline, citing Beaver High Priest Meeting Minutes.
  114. David Roche Turley II, Minersville and Beaver Field Trip timeline, citing Beaver High Priest Meeting Minutes.
  115. David Roche Turley II, Minersville and Beaver Field Trip timeline, citing Beaver High Priest Meeting Minutes.
  116. David Roche Turley II, Minersville and Beaver Field Trip timeline, citing Beaver High Priest Meeting Minutes.
  117. David Roche Turley II, Minersville and Beaver Field Trip timeline, citing Beaver High Priest Meeting Minutes.
  118. David Roche Turley II, Minersville and Beaver Field Trip timeline, citing Beaver High Priest Meeting Minutes.
  119. David Roche Turley II, Minersville and Beaver Field Trip timeline, citing Beaver High Priest Meeting Minutes.
  120. David Roche Turley II, Minersville and Beaver Field Trip timeline, citing Beaver High Priest Meeting Minutes.
  121. David Roche Turley II, Minersville and Beaver Field Trip timeline, citing Beaver High Priest Meeting Minutes.
  122. David Roche Turley II, Minersville and Beaver Field Trip timeline, citing Beaver High Priest Meeting Minutes.
  123. David Roche Turley II, Minersville and Beaver Field Trip timeline, citing Beaver High Priest Meeting Minutes.
  124. David Roche Turley II, Minersville and Beaver Field Trip timeline, citing Beaver High Priest Meeting Minutes.
  125. “Correspondence from Elder A. M. Lyman,” Salt Lake Tribune, Saturday, June 18, 1870, p. 1, GenealogyBank.com, accessed 5 May 2019. For more information on the Godbeite movement (also called the Church of Zion or New Movement), see this short description at the Utah History Encyclopedia by Ronald Walker. A more in-depth treatment of the Godbeite movement is Ronald Walker’s Wayward Saints: The Godbeites and Brigham Young (Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1998).
  126. “Progress of the Movement in Beaver,” Salt Lake Tribune, Saturday, June 25, 1870, p. 3, GenealogyBank.com, accessed 5 May 2019. For more information on the Godbeite movement (also called the Church of Zion or New Movement), see this short description at the Utah History Encyclopedia by Ronald Walker. A more in-depth treatment of the Godbeite movement is Ronald Walker’s Wayward Saints: The Godbeites and Brigham Young (Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1998).
  127. “Local and Other Matters,” Deseret News, Thursday, June 23, 1870, p. 3, https://newspapers.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s67120pr/23156561, accessed 16 April 2020; “Local and Other Matters,” Deseret News, Wednesday, June 29, 1870, p. 1, https://newspapers.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s6tb22cx/2605900, accessed 16 April 2020.
  128. Family records, based on a handwritten Family Memorial (Sarah Ellen Clift), state Theodore died on August 12, 1871. Amasa M. Lyman’s journal (entry of 22 August 1871) and Theodore’s 1872 probate record both give his date of death as August 18th. Probate Records and Registers, 1856-June 1883,” Probate record of Theodore Turley, dated 30 July 1872, FHL 485230; Scott H. Partridge, ed., Thirteenth Apostle: The Diaries of Amasa M. Lyman, 1832-1877 (Salt Lake City: Signature Books, 2016), 666. Related blog post: “Do We have Theodore’s Death Date Wrong?”
  129. Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 16 April 2020), memorial page for Theodore Turley (10 Apr 1801–12 Aug 1871), Find a Grave Memorial no. 51057, citing Mountain View Cemetery, Beaver, Beaver County, Utah, USA.